# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Army JROTC IV Task 1513900962

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Research the regional and political history of a foreign land where the U.S. maintains a military presence.

Definition

Research should include
  • selecting an engagement (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia)
  • determining the causes for and dates of initial U.S. operations
  • identifying milestones, achievements, setbacks
  • identifying the current status, resolution, or outlook
  • documenting the sources used for research.

Process/Skill Questions

  • Why is it important to research other regions?
  • What foreign country has influenced U.S. relations on an international scale? Explain.

Related Standards of Learning

English

12.6

The student will write in a variety of forms to include persuasive/argumentative reflective, interpretive, and analytic with an emphasis on persuasion/argumentation.
  1. Apply components of a recursive writing process for multiple purposes to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  2. Produce arguments in writing that develop a thesis to demonstrate knowledgeable judgments, address counterclaims, and provide effective conclusions.
  3. Use a variety of rhetorical strategies to clarify and defend a position organizing claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a sustained and logical sequence.
  4. Blend multiple forms of writing including embedding a narrative to produce effective essays.
  5. Adapt evidence, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation.
  6. Use words, phrases, clauses, and varied syntax to connect all parts of the argument creating cohesion from the information presented.
  7. Revise writing for clarity of content, depth of information, and technique of presentation.
  8. Write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education.
  9. Write to clearly describe personal qualifications for potential occupational or educational opportunities.

12.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for Standard English.
  1. Use complex sentence structure to infuse sentence variety in writing.
  2. Edit, proofread, and prepare writing for intended audience and purpose.
  3. Use a style manual, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), to apply rules for punctuation and formatting of direct quotations.

12.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Frame, analyze, and synthesize information to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Critically evaluate the accuracy, quality, and validity of the information.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

History and Social Science

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

GOVT.3

The student will apply social science skills to understand the concepts of democracy by

  1. recognizing the fundamental worth and dignity of the individual;
  2. recognizing the equality of all citizens under the law;
  3. recognizing what defines a citizen and how noncitizens can become citizens;
  4. recognizing majority rule and minority rights;
  5. recognizing the necessity of compromise; and
  6. recognizing the freedom of the individual.

GOVT.4

The student will apply social science skills to understand the Constitution of the United States by

  1. examining the ratification debates and The Federalist;
  2. evaluating the purposes for government stated in the Preamble;
  3. examining the fundamental principles upon which the Constitution of the United States is based, including the rule of law, consent of the governed, limited government, separation of powers, and federalism;
  4. defining the structure of the national government outlined in Article I, Article II, and Article III; and
  5. analyzing and explaining the amendment process.

GOVT.12

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of the United States in a changing world by

  1. describing the responsibilities of the national government for foreign policy and national security;
  2. assessing the role of national interest in shaping foreign policy and promoting world peace; and
  3. examining the relationship of Virginia and the United States to the global economy, including trends in international trade.

GOVT.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand how world governments and economies compare and contrast with the government and the economy in the United States by

  1. describing the distribution of governmental power;
  2. explaining the relationship between the legislative and executive branches;
  3. comparing and contrasting the extent of participation in the political process; and
  4. comparing and contrasting economic systems.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.4

The student will apply social science skills to understand the issues and events leading to and during the Revolutionary Period by

  1. describing the results of the French and Indian War;
  2. evaluating how political ideas of the Enlightenment helped shape American politics;
  3. explaining how conflicting loyalties created political differences among the colonists concerning separation from Great Britain;
  4. analyzing the competing factors that led to colonial victory in the Revolutionary War; and
  5. evaluating how key principles in the Declaration of Independence grew in importance to become unifying ideas of American political philosophy.

VUS.6

The student will apply social science skills to understand major events in Virginia and United States history during the first half of the nineteenth century by

  1. explaining territorial expansion and its impact on the American Indians;
  2. describing the political results of territorial expansion;
  3. assessing the political and economic changes that occurred during this period, with emphasis on James Madison and the War of 1812;
  4. analyzing the social and cultural changes during the period, with emphasis on “the age of the common man” (Jacksonian Era);
  5. evaluating the cultural, economic, and political issues that divided the nation, including tariffs, slavery, the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements, and the role of the states in the Union.;
  6. explaining how Manifest Destiny and President James K. Polk’s policies impacted the nation; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the multiple causes and compromises leading to the Civil War, including the role of the institution of slavery.

VUS.7

The student will apply social science skills to understand of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras and their significance as major turning points in American history by

  1. describing major events and the roles of key leaders of the Civil War era, with emphasis on Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglass;
  2. evaluating and explaining the significance and development of Abraham Lincoln’s leadership and political statements, including the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation and the principles outlined in the Gettysburg Address;
  3. evaluating and explaining the impact of the war on Americans, with emphasis on Virginians, African Americans, the common soldier, and the home front;
  4. evaluating postwar Reconstruction plans presented by key leaders of the Civil War; and
  5. evaluating and explaining the political and economic impact of the war and Reconstruction, including the adoption of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States.

VUS.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the emerging role of the United States in world affairs during the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by

  1. explaining changes in foreign policy of the United States toward Latin America and Asia and the growing influence of the United States, with emphasis on the impact of the Spanish-American War;
  2. evaluating the United States’ involvement in World War I, including Wilson’s Fourteen Points; and
  3. evaluating and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, with emphasis on the national debate in response to the League of Nations.

VUS.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II by

  1. analyzing the causes and events that led to American involvement in the war, including the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the American response;
  2. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the European theater;
  3. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the Pacific theater;
  4. evaluating and explaining how the United States mobilized its economic and military resources, including the role of all-minority military units (the Tuskegee Airmen and Nisei regiments) and the contributions of media, minorities, and women to the war effort;
  5. analyzing the Holocaust (Hitler’s “final solution”), its impact on Jews and other groups, and the postwar trials of war criminals; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the treatment of prisoners of war and civilians by the Allied and Axis powers.

VUS.12

The student will apply social science skills to understand the United States’ foreign policy during the Cold War era by

  1. locating and explaining the political boundary changes, and the formation of the United Nations and the Marshall Plan;
  2. explaining the origins and early development of the Cold War and how it changed American foreign policy, with emphasis on the Truman Doctrine and the policy of containment of communism;
  3. analyzing the efforts of the United States to protect Western Europe, including the role of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO);
  4. analyzing the changing role of the United States in Asia, including Korea, Vietnam, and China;
  5. evaluating and explaining how policy changes impacted the United States’ relationships in Latin America;
  6. analyzing the domestic impact of the Cold War; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the factors that caused the collapse of communism in Europe and how it changed American foreign policy, including the role of Ronald Reagan.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WG.5

The student will analyze the characteristics of the regions of the United States and Canada by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2.  describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4.  recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.6

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Latin American and Caribbean regions by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.7

The student will analyze the characteristics of the European region by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.8

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Russian and Central Asian regions by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.9

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Sub-Saharan African region by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.10

The student will analyze the characteristics of the North African and Southwest Asian regions by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.11

The student will analyze the characteristics of the South Asian and Southeast Asian regions by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.12

The student will analyze the characteristics of the East Asian region by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.13

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Australian and Pacific Islands regions by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.14

The student will apply social science skills to compare and contrast the distribution, growth rates, and characteristics of human population by

  1. examining demographic data to determine the relative level of development;
  2. distinguishing between developed and developing countries; and
  3. comparing and contrasting the level of economic development to the standard of living and quality of life.

WG.15

The student will apply social science skills to analyze past and present trends in human migration and cultural diffusion by

  1. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion are influenced by social, economic, political, and environmental factors and
  2. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion influence the current human characteristics of places and regions.

WG.17

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the impact of globalization by

  1. identifying factors, including comparative advantage, that influence the distribution of economic activities and trade;
  2. describing ways that economic and social interactions change over time; and
  3. mapping, describing, and evaluating economic unions.

WG.18

The student will apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface by

  1. explaining and evaluating reasons for the creation of different political divisions; and
  2. describing ways cooperation among political jurisdictions is used to solve problems and settle disputes.

WHII.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand global interactions between 1800 to about 1900 by

  1. locating the United States of America, describing its expansion between 1776 and 1900, and assessing its changing role in the world;
  2. locating Latin America, explaining the causes and effects of the revolutions, with emphasis on the contributions of Toussaint L’Ouverture and Simón Bolívar, and identifying the impact of the American and French Revolutions on Latin America;
  3. describing the political and social challenges faced by Latin American nations, with emphasis on the Monroe Doctrine;
  4. assessing the impact of European colonization and imperialism on Asia, Africa, the Pacific Islands, and Australia; and
  5. analyzing the relationship between industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism.

WHII.10

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War I and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining economic and political causes and identifying major leaders of the war, with emphasis on Woodrow Wilson and Kaiser Wilhelm II;
  2. describing the location of major battles and the role of new technologies;
  3. analyzing and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the actions of the League of Nations, with emphasis on the mandate system;
  4. citing causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution;
  5. explaining the causes and assessing the impact of worldwide depression in the 1930s; and
  6. examining the rise of totalitarianism.

WHII.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining the major causes of the war;
  2. describing the leaders of the war, with emphasis on Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Hirohito;
  3. describing the major events, including major battles and the role of new technologies;
  4. examining the Holocaust and other examples of genocide in the twentieth century; and
  5. examining the effects of the war, with emphasis on the terms of the peace, the war crimes trials, the division of Europe, plans to rebuild Germany and Japan, and the creation of international cooperative organizations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948).

WHII.12

The student will apply social science skills to understand the conflicts during the second half of the twentieth century by

  1. explaining the causes of the Cold War, including the competition between the American and Soviet economic and political systems and the causes of the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe;
  2. describing the major leaders and events of the Cold War, including the location of major conflicts;
  3. describing conflicts and revolutionary movements in Asia and their major leaders, including Mao Tse-tung (Zedong), Chiang Kai-shek, Deng Xiaoping, and Ho Chi Minh; and
  4. examining the political and economic shifts that led to the end of the Cold War, with emphasis on Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, and Ronald Reagan.

WHII.15

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the influence of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism in the contemporary world by

  1. describing their beliefs, sacred writings, traditions, and customs; and
  2. locating the geographic distribution of religions in the contemporary world.