# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Small Engine Technology II Task 230397552

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Follow safety standards and regulations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Equipment and Engine Training Council (EETC) Education Committee, and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

Definition

Identification should include the regulations and requirements of EPA, OSHA, EETC, and MSDS for the use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials. Discussion should include the correct applications, the training, and the penalties associated with each regulation/requirement, according to government ordinances and instructor’s guidelines.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What information should be sent with emergency responders to the hospital with the student if a chemical is splashed in an eye or wound?
  • Are state and national safety standards followed in school labs/workshops? Explain.
  • What agency requires labs/workshops and businesses to use the services of companies such as Safety Clean?
  • What are the dangers of running an engine in a confined space without proper ventilation?
     

Related Standards of Learning

English

11.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and follow directions to complete an application for college admission, for a scholarship, or for employment.
  3. Generalize ideas from selections to make predictions about other texts.
  4. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support.
  5. Analyze two or more texts addressing the same topic to identify authors’ purposes and determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  6. Identify false premises in persuasive writing.
  7. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  8. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical-thinking questions before, during, and after reading texts.

12.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical-thinking questions before, during, and after reading texts.
  2. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  3. Analyze two or more texts addressing the same topic to identify authors’ purposes and determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Identify false premises in persuasive writing.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support.

History and Social Science

GOVT.16

The student will apply social science skills to understand that in a democratic republic, thoughtful and effective participation in civic life is characterized by

  1. exercising personal character traits such as trustworthiness, responsibility, and honesty;
  2. obeying the law and paying taxes;
  3. serving as a juror;
  4. participating in the political process and voting in local, state, and national elections;
  5. performing public service;
  6. keeping informed about current issues;
  7. respecting differing opinions and the rights of others;
  8. practicing personal and fiscal responsibility;
  9. demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that foster the responsible and respectful use of digital media; and
  10. practicing patriotism.

Science

CH.1

The student will investigate and understand that experiments in which variables are measured, analyzed, and evaluated produce observations and verifiable data. Key concepts include
  1. designated laboratory techniques;
  2. safe use of chemicals and equipment;
  3. proper response to emergency situations;
  4. manipulation of multiple variables, using repeated trials;
  5. accurate recording, organization, and analysis of data through repeated trials;
  6. mathematical and procedural error analysis;
  7. mathematical manipulations including SI units, scientific notation, linear equations, graphing, ratio and proportion, significant digits, and dimensional analysis;
  8. use of appropriate technology including computers, graphing calculators, and probeware for gathering data, communicating results, and using simulations to model concepts;
  9. construction and defense of a scientific viewpoint; and
  10. the use of current applications to reinforce chemistry concepts.