# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Computer Networking Hardware Operations I Task 898559803

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Identify network security terminology.

Definition

Identification should include network security terms and their associated definitions.

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify text organization and structure.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim manuals or informational sources to locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and follow directions to complete an application for college admission, for a scholarship, or for employment.
  3. Generalize ideas from selections to make predictions about other texts.
  4. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support.
  5. Analyze two or more texts addressing the same topic to identify authors’ purposes and determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  6. Identify false premises in persuasive writing.
  7. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  8. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical-thinking questions before, during, and after reading texts.

12.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical-thinking questions before, during, and after reading texts.
  2. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  3. Analyze two or more texts addressing the same topic to identify authors’ purposes and determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Identify false premises in persuasive writing.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support.

History and Social Science

GOVT.6

The student will apply social science skills to understand local, state, and national elections by

  1. describing the nomination and election process, including the organization and evolving role of political parties;
  2. examining campaign funding and spending, including the impact of Supreme Court decisions, the nationalization of campaign financing, and the role of issue groups;
  3. analyzing the influence of media coverage, campaign advertising, public opinion polls, social media, and digital communications on elections;
  4. investigating and explaining the impact of reapportionment and redistricting on elections and governance;
  5. describing how amendments have extended the right to vote; and
  6. analyzing voter turnout in local, state, and national elections.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture