# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Production Systems Task 1705116179

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Identify the four phases of the industrial revolution, focusing on industrial revolution 4.0.

Definition

Identification should include
  • when mechanized equipment (powered by hydroelectric and steam power) was first used
  • when and how mass production of goods in factories (powered by electricity) became significant
  • how automation was developed and improved using programmable machinery
  • how digital connection between humans and machines has developed and improved.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What was the importance of the steam engine to manufacturing?
  •  How did the dependency on hydroelectric and steam power in phase one of the industrial revolution limit manufacturers?
  • What are some examples of how electricity increased production during phase two of the industrial revolution?
  • What was the first mass-produced item (on an assembly line)?
  • What contributed to automation in manufacturing?
  • How did the use of programmable machinery affect the workforce?
  • What are some examples of humans communicating with machines?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

History and Social Science

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

VUS.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, political, and cultural movements and changes in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century by

  1. explaining the factors that led to United States expansion;
  2. evaluating and explaining the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, the roles of Thurgood Marshall and Oliver W. Hill, Sr., and how Virginia responded to the decision;
  3. explaining how the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the 1963 March on Washington, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) had an impact on all Americans;
  4. analyzing changes in immigration policy and the impact of increased immigration;
  5. evaluating and explaining the foreign and domestic policies pursued by the American government after the Cold War;
  6. explaining how scientific and technological advances altered American lives; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the changes that occurred in American culture.

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900 by

  1. explaining the roles of resources, capital, and entrepreneurship in developing an industrial economy;
  2. analyzing the effects of the Industrial Revolution on society and culture, with emphasis on the evolution of the nature of work and the labor force, including its effects on families and the status of women and children;
  3. describing how industrialization affected economic and political systems in Europe, with emphasis on the slave trade and the labor union movement;
  4. assessing the impact of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna on political power in Europe;
  5. explaining the events related to the unification of Italy and the role of Italian nationalism; and
  6. explaining the events related to the unification of Germany and the role of Bismarck.

WHII.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century by

  1. identifying contemporary political issues, with emphasis on migrations of refugees and others, ethnic/religious conflicts, and the impact of technology, including the role of social media and chemical and biological technologies;
  2. assessing the link between economic and political freedom;
  3. describing economic interdependence, including the rise of multinational corporations, international organizations, and trade agreements; and
  4. analyzing the increasing impact of terrorism.