# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Sustainability and Renewable Technologies Task 1953536648

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Evaluate a variety of media and informational sources for reliability, bias, and propaganda.

Definition

Evaluation should include examining various messages and considering the source, the intended audience, and the purpose (e.g., to inform, to persuade). Citations and funding sources will help determine whether it is reliable or should be recognized as biased.

Process/Skill Questions

  • Why should you be suspicious of an energy company’s so-called environmentally-friendly initiatives?
  • What should you consider when determining the reliability of research?
  • What groups or resources exist for checking the veracity of media and informational sources (e.g., Green Inc. by Christine Catherine MacDonald)?
  • What is "greenwashing"?
  • Are any sources of information truly unbiased? Explain your answer.
  • What are some standards for deciding the degree of bias in an information source?
  • How do various news shows depict sustainability issues?
  • Why are there differences when news channels report on the same issue?
  • Who owns the major news channels and newspapers?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.2

The student will produce, analyze, and evaluate media messages.
  1. Analyze and interpret special effects used in media messages.
  2. Determine the purpose of the media message and its effect on the audience.
  3. Analyze the purpose of information and persuasive techniques used in diverse media formats.
  4. Evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind media presentation(s).
  5. Examine how values and viewpoints are included or excluded and how the media can influence beliefs, behaviors, and interpretations.
  6. Describe possible cause and effect relationships between mass media coverage and public opinion trends.
  7. Evaluate sources including advertisements, editorials, political cartoons, and feature stories for relationships between intent and factual content.
  8. Monitor, analyze, and use multiple streams of simultaneous information.
  9. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet when evaluating or producing creative or informational media messages.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.2

The student will examine, analyze, and produce media messages.
  1. Create media messages for diverse audiences.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Evaluate sources for relationships between intent, factual content, and opinion.
  4. Analyze the impact of selected media formats on meaning.
  5. Analyze the purpose of information and persuasive techniques used in diverse media formats.
  6. Evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind media presentation(s).
  7. Describe possible cause and effect relationships between mass media coverage and public opinion trends.
  8. Monitor, analyze, and use multiple streams of simultaneous information.
  9. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet when evaluating or producing creative or informational media messages.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.2

The student will examine how values and points of view are included or excluded and how media influences beliefs and behaviors.
  1. Describe possible cause and effect relationships between mass media coverage and public opinion trends.
  2. Create media messages with a specific point of view.
  3. Evaluate media sources for relationships between intent and content.
  4. Analyze the impact of selected media formats on meaning.
  5. Determine the author’s purpose and intended effect on the audience for media messages.
  6. Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information.
  7. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet when evaluating or producing creative or informational media messages.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.2

The student will examine how values and points of view are included or excluded and how media influences beliefs and behaviors.
  1. Describe possible cause and effect relationships between mass media coverage and public opinion trends.
  2. Evaluate media sources for relationships between intent and factual content.
  3. Evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind media presentation(s).
  4. Examine how values and viewpoints are included or excluded and how the media can influence beliefs, behaviors, and interpretations.
  5. Evaluate sources including advertisements, editorials, political cartoons, and feature stories for relationships between intent and factual content.
  6. Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information.
  7. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet when evaluating or producing creative or informational media messages.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

Mathematics

PS.9*

The student will plan and conduct a survey. The plan will address sampling techniques and methods to reduce bias.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

17. Information and Communication Technologies

 

TSA Competitive Events

Debating Technological Issues

 

Essays on Technology

 

Extemporaneous Speech

 

Prepared Presentation