# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Sustainability and Renewable Technologies Task 1953536647

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Analyze an individual’s impact on natural resources.

Definition

Analysis should include considering data that measures an individual’s contact with and consumption of natural resources in a given timeframe (e.g., day, week, lifetime). Impact may be driven by consumer choices, such as transportation, energy use, purchases, and leisure activities.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What effects do motor-boating, tubing, and waterskiing in rivers and lakes have on the water, shoreline, and surrounding ecosystems?
  • How does your consumption of meat products contribute to carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere?
  • When buying a new car, what are the personal, environmental, and economic considerations you would need to analyze?
  • What is the monetary savings over 10 years between a car that gets 20 miles to the gallon and one that gets 35 miles to the gallon if you pay $3.50 per gallon and drive 5200 miles per year? ($4,000 savings over 10 years)
  • What resources do you affect by riding a school bus (or driving a personal vehicle) five days a week? What resources would you affect riding a bicycle to school or work?
  • In a given week what have you done that has an impact on the area's natural resources? Are those effects positive or negative? Explain.
  • What effects do our decisions about waste disposal have on the availability and quality of natural resources?
  • What steps can individuals take to reduce their consumption of natural resources?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

VUS.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, political, and cultural movements and changes in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century by

  1. explaining the factors that led to United States expansion;
  2. evaluating and explaining the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, the roles of Thurgood Marshall and Oliver W. Hill, Sr., and how Virginia responded to the decision;
  3. explaining how the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the 1963 March on Washington, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) had an impact on all Americans;
  4. analyzing changes in immigration policy and the impact of increased immigration;
  5. evaluating and explaining the foreign and domestic policies pursued by the American government after the Cold War;
  6. explaining how scientific and technological advances altered American lives; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the changes that occurred in American culture.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WG.4

The student will apply social science skills to evaluate the significance of natural, human, and capital resources by

  1. comparing the distribution of major natural resources throughout world regions;
  2. showing the influence of resources on patterns of economic activity and land use; and
  3. evaluating perspectives regarding the use of resources.

WHII.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand of the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts by

  1. describing the struggles for self-rule, including Gandhi’s leadership in India and the development of India’s democracy;
  2. describing Africa’s independence movements, including Jomo Kenyatta’s leadership of Kenya and Nelson Mandela’s role in South Africa; and
  3. describing the end of the mandate system and the creation of states in the Middle East, including the roles of Golda Meir and Gamal Abdel Nasser.

WHII.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century by

  1. identifying contemporary political issues, with emphasis on migrations of refugees and others, ethnic/religious conflicts, and the impact of technology, including the role of social media and chemical and biological technologies;
  2. assessing the link between economic and political freedom;
  3. describing economic interdependence, including the rise of multinational corporations, international organizations, and trade agreements; and
  4. analyzing the increasing impact of terrorism.

Mathematics

PS.2*

The student will analyze numerical characteristics of univariate data sets to describe patterns and departures from patterns, using mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation, interquartile range, range, and outliers.

PS.3*

The student will compare distributions of two or more univariate data sets, numerically and graphically, analyzing center and spread (within group and between group variations), clusters and gaps, shapes, outliers, or other unusual features.

PS.4*

The student will analyze scatterplots to identify and describe the relationship between two variables, using shape; strength of relationship; clusters; positive, negative, or no association; outliers; and influential points.

PS.5

The student will determine and interpret linear correlation, use the method of least squares regression to model the linear relationship between two variables, and use the residual plot to assess linearity.

Science

BIO.8

The student will investigate and understand dynamic equilibria within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Key concepts include
  1. interactions within and among populations, including carrying capacities, limiting factors, and growth curves;
  2. nutrient cycling with energy flow through ecosystems;
  3. succession patterns in ecosystems;
  4. the effects of natural events and human activities on ecosystems; and
  5. analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems.

ES.6

The student will investigate and understand the differences between renewable and nonrenewable resources. Key concepts include
  1. fossil fuels, minerals, rocks, water, and vegetation;
  2. advantages and disadvantages of various energy sources;
  3. resources found in Virginia; and
  4. environmental costs and benefits.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

13. Assess the Impact of Products and Systems

 

15. Agricultural and Related Biotechnologies

 

18. Transportation Technologies

 

5. The Effects of Technology on the Environment

 

TSA Competitive Events

Debating Technological Issues

 

Essays on Technology

 

Extemporaneous Speech

 

Prepared Presentation