# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Sustainability and Renewable Technologies Task 1410030319

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Examine the interconnectedness between man-made structures and the natural environment.

Definition

Examination should include exploring the relationships between man-made structures (e.g., transportation infrastructure, buildings) and the natural environment. Exploration should also include studying methods for lessening the impact structures have on the environment.

Process/Skill Questions

  • How does a building impact water, habitat, and temperature in an urban area?
  • How do hardscape surfaces impact groundwater recharge?
  • How does building a new bridge alter the surrounding natural environment?
  • When a new dam is constructed, what changes occur to the water flow and patterns?
  • In what ways do man-made structures interact with the natural environment?
  • When structures are built, how is the land on the site affected?
  • When structures are built, how is the albedo (reflecting power) of the ground affected?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

WG.14

The student will apply social science skills to compare and contrast the distribution, growth rates, and characteristics of human population by

  1. examining demographic data to determine the relative level of development;
  2. distinguishing between developed and developing countries; and
  3. comparing and contrasting the level of economic development to the standard of living and quality of life.

WG.15

The student will apply social science skills to analyze past and present trends in human migration and cultural diffusion by

  1. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion are influenced by social, economic, political, and environmental factors and
  2. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion influence the current human characteristics of places and regions.

WG.16

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the patterns of urban development by

  1. applying the concepts of site and situation to major cities in each region;
  2. explaining how the functions of towns and cities have changed over time; and
  3. describing the unique influence of urban areas and challenges they face.

WG.17

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the impact of globalization by

  1. identifying factors, including comparative advantage, that influence the distribution of economic activities and trade;
  2. describing ways that economic and social interactions change over time; and
  3. mapping, describing, and evaluating economic unions.

WG.18

The student will apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface by

  1. explaining and evaluating reasons for the creation of different political divisions; and
  2. describing ways cooperation among political jurisdictions is used to solve problems and settle disputes.

Science

ES.2

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of science and scientific reasoning and logic. Key concepts include
  1. science explains and predicts the interactions and dynamics of complex Earth systems;
  2. evidence is required to evaluate hypotheses and explanations;
  3. observation and logic are essential for reaching a conclusion; and
  4. evidence is evaluated for scientific theories.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

13. Assess the Impact of Products and Systems

 

20. Construction Technologies

 

3. The Relationships Among Technologies and the Connections Between Technology and Other Fields

 

9. Engineering Design

 

TSA Competitive Events

Architectural Design