# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Sustainability and Renewable Technologies Task 1258989837

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Debate strategies for responding to major environmental issues.

Definition

Debate should determine the practicality and likely success of various strategies for solving major environmental issues such as, but not limited to,
  • climate change
  • energy production/consumption
  • land use
  • pollution
  • deforestation
  • condition of fisheries
  • water scarcity
  • food supply.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What strategies are being employed to address greenhouse gas emissions?
  • How does the global community approach policy for addressing environmental issues?
  • What are some potential solutions to major environmental issues?
  • What advantages and disadvantages do each of the potential solutions entail?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.1

The student will participate in, collaborate in, and make multimodal presentations both independently and in small groups.
  1. Make strategic use of multimodal tools.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Use vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  4. Assist with setting rules for group work including informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views and goal setting.
  5. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks.
  6. Share responsibility for collaborative work.
  7. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  8. Include all group members, acknowledge new information expressed by others, and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  9. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  10. Evaluate impact, purpose, point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric of presentation(s).
  11. Use self-reflection to evaluate one’s own role in preparation and participation in small-group activities.

10.1

The student will make planned multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Make strategic use of multimodal tools.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively with diverse teams including setting rules and goals for group work such as coming to informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, and presenting alternate views.
  4. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks.
  5. Include all group members and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  8. Choose vocabulary, language, and tone appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Access, critically evaluate, and use information accurately to solve problems.
  10. Use reflection to evaluate one’s own role and the group process in small-group activities.
  11. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, use of evidence, rhetoric, and identify any faulty reasoning.

11.1

The student will make planned informative and persuasive multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Select and effectively use multimodal tools to design and develop presentation content.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with diverse teams.
  4. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  5. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  6. Anticipate and address alternative or opposing perspectives and counterclaims.
  7. Evaluate the various techniques used to construct arguments in multimodal presentations.
  8. Use vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Evaluate effectiveness of multimodal presentations.

12.1

The student will make planned persuasive/argumentative, multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Select and effectively use multimodal tools to design and develop presentation content.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with diverse teams.
  4. Anticipate and address alternative or opposing perspectives and counterclaims.
  5. Evaluate the various techniques used to construct arguments in multimodal presentations.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Critique effectiveness of multimodal presentations.

History and Social Science

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

WG.14

The student will apply social science skills to compare and contrast the distribution, growth rates, and characteristics of human population by

  1. examining demographic data to determine the relative level of development;
  2. distinguishing between developed and developing countries; and
  3. comparing and contrasting the level of economic development to the standard of living and quality of life.

WG.15

The student will apply social science skills to analyze past and present trends in human migration and cultural diffusion by

  1. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion are influenced by social, economic, political, and environmental factors and
  2. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion influence the current human characteristics of places and regions.

WG.16

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the patterns of urban development by

  1. applying the concepts of site and situation to major cities in each region;
  2. explaining how the functions of towns and cities have changed over time; and
  3. describing the unique influence of urban areas and challenges they face.

WG.17

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the impact of globalization by

  1. identifying factors, including comparative advantage, that influence the distribution of economic activities and trade;
  2. describing ways that economic and social interactions change over time; and
  3. mapping, describing, and evaluating economic unions.

WG.18

The student will apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface by

  1. explaining and evaluating reasons for the creation of different political divisions; and
  2. describing ways cooperation among political jurisdictions is used to solve problems and settle disputes.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

5. The Effects of Technology on the Environment

 

TSA Competitive Events

Debating Technological Issues