# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Sustainability and Renewable Technologies Task 1258989819

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Illustrate the interconnectedness of the global community.

Definition

Illustration should employ a systems-thinking approach to demonstrate the relationships (i.e., economic, political, and social) that exist at multiple levels (local, national, international) throughout the world. Illustration should consider that consumerism is driving the global interconnectedness.

Process/Skill Questions

  • How would you explain a systems-thinking approach?
  • How does the sale of t-shirts made from cotton grown in the midwestern U.S. impact the physical health of persons living in the region?
  • When a consumer chooses a product manufactured in a developing country, and the choice is made solely because of the product’s lower price, what effect might that decision have?
  • What is meant by “fair trade,” and what are its implications?
  • What is meant by the “new global economy”?
  • How are conflicts in the Middle East and growth of a middle class in Asia affecting the price of gas in the United States?
  • How can a disaster in one area of the world affect other areas of the world economically?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.1

The student will participate in, collaborate in, and make multimodal presentations both independently and in small groups.
  1. Make strategic use of multimodal tools.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Use vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  4. Assist with setting rules for group work including informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views and goal setting.
  5. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks.
  6. Share responsibility for collaborative work.
  7. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  8. Include all group members, acknowledge new information expressed by others, and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  9. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  10. Evaluate impact, purpose, point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric of presentation(s).
  11. Use self-reflection to evaluate one’s own role in preparation and participation in small-group activities.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.1

The student will make planned multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Make strategic use of multimodal tools.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively with diverse teams including setting rules and goals for group work such as coming to informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, and presenting alternate views.
  4. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks.
  5. Include all group members and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  8. Choose vocabulary, language, and tone appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Access, critically evaluate, and use information accurately to solve problems.
  10. Use reflection to evaluate one’s own role and the group process in small-group activities.
  11. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, use of evidence, rhetoric, and identify any faulty reasoning.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.1

The student will make planned informative and persuasive multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Select and effectively use multimodal tools to design and develop presentation content.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with diverse teams.
  4. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  5. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  6. Anticipate and address alternative or opposing perspectives and counterclaims.
  7. Evaluate the various techniques used to construct arguments in multimodal presentations.
  8. Use vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Evaluate effectiveness of multimodal presentations.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.1

The student will make planned persuasive/argumentative, multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Select and effectively use multimodal tools to design and develop presentation content.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with diverse teams.
  4. Anticipate and address alternative or opposing perspectives and counterclaims.
  5. Evaluate the various techniques used to construct arguments in multimodal presentations.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Critique effectiveness of multimodal presentations.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.7

The student will apply social science skills to understand the organization and powers of the national government by

  1. examining the legislative, executive, and judicial branches;
  2. analyzing the relationships among the three branches in a system of checks and balances and separation of powers; and
  3. investigating and explaining the ways individuals and groups exert influence on the national government.

GOVT.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the organization and powers of the state and local governments described in the Constitution of Virginia by

  1. examining the legislative, executive, and judicial branches;
  2. examining the structure and powers of local governments (county, city, and town);
  3. analyzing the relationship between state and local governments and the roles of regional authorities, governing boards, and commissions;
  4. investigating and explaining the ways individuals and groups exert influence on state and local governments; and
  5. evaluating the effectiveness of citizen efforts to influence decisions of state and local governments by examining historical or contemporary events.

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

WG.17

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the impact of globalization by

  1. identifying factors, including comparative advantage, that influence the distribution of economic activities and trade;
  2. describing ways that economic and social interactions change over time; and
  3. mapping, describing, and evaluating economic unions.

WG.18

The student will apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface by

  1. explaining and evaluating reasons for the creation of different political divisions; and
  2. describing ways cooperation among political jurisdictions is used to solve problems and settle disputes.

Mathematics

DM.12

The student will use the recursive process and difference equations with the aid of appropriate technology to generate
  1. compound interest;
  2. sequences and series;
  3. fractals;
  4. population growth models; and
  5. the Fibonacci sequence.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

13. Assess the Impact of Products and Systems

 

17. Information and Communication Technologies

 

3. The Relationships Among Technologies and the Connections Between Technology and Other Fields

 

6. The Role of Society in the Development and Use of Technology

 

TSA Competitive Events

Digital Video Production

 

Geospatial Technology (Virginia only)

 

Scientific Visualization (SciVis)

 

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