# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Sustainability and Renewable Technologies Task 1258989818

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Interpret sustainability as it applies to social, economic, and environmental issues.

Definition

Interpretation should include defining sustainability as it relates to cultural and personal philosophies, government policies and business practices, and the environment and natural resources.

Process/Skill Questions

  • For a word that can have many permutations, what is the simplest way to define sustainability?
  • What conditions (e.g., economic climate; desire for status symbols; lack of interest, knowledge, or understanding) can be blamed for society’s reluctance to practice sustainability?
  • How might one's awareness of sustainability in one aspect of life (e.g., energy consumption) lead to practicing sustainability in other areas (e.g., landscaping)?
  • How can intangibles, such as compromised natural resources and impact to future generations, be valued so that economic comparisons can be made to determine the value of investing in sustainability?
  • Explain how sustainability could be achieved differently in the first world versus the third world. Which is more sustainable right now?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Identify the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms, to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms, to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms, and literary and classical allusions in text.
  5. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

13. Assess the Impact of Products and Systems

 

15. Agricultural and Related Biotechnologies

 

16. Energy and Power Technologies

 

17. Information and Communication Technologies

 

19. Manufacturing Technologies

 

20. Construction Technologies

 

4. The Cultural, Social, Economic, and Political Effects of Technology

 

5. The Effects of Technology on the Environment

 

6. The Role of Society in the Development and Use of Technology

 

TSA Competitive Events

Debating Technological Issues

 

Essays on Technology

 

Extemporaneous Speech