# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Early Childhood, Education, and Services II Task 455932994

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Establish reciprocal interactions between families/programs/providers regarding children’s development.

Definition

Established interactions should include
  • items of general interest to parents
  • one-on-one contact suggesting research-based strategies to deal with a concern regarding a specific child
  • resources and child development information. Information may be shared via
    • newsletter
    • website
    • personal conference
    • progress report.

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • What information should students communicate to parents/guardians?
  • How does a student effectively communicate with parents/guardians?
Communication
  • How does one determine which information is appropriate to share with parents?
  • What are the consequences of sharing information that is not accurate or developmentally appropriate?
Leadership
  • What skills are needed to select developmental topics to share with parents?
  • What should be done to ensure that the information shared with parents is accurate?
Management
  • What criteria can be used to evaluate the quality and accuracy of the developmental topics shared with parents?
  • What are the advantages/disadvantages of sharing information with parents regarding developmental topics and concerns related to children?

Related Standards of Learning

English

11.2

The student will examine how values and points of view are included or excluded and how media influences beliefs and behaviors.
  1. Describe possible cause and effect relationships between mass media coverage and public opinion trends.
  2. Create media messages with a specific point of view.
  3. Evaluate media sources for relationships between intent and content.
  4. Analyze the impact of selected media formats on meaning.
  5. Determine the author’s purpose and intended effect on the audience for media messages.
  6. Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information.
  7. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet when evaluating or producing creative or informational media messages.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.2

The student will examine how values and points of view are included or excluded and how media influences beliefs and behaviors.
  1. Describe possible cause and effect relationships between mass media coverage and public opinion trends.
  2. Evaluate media sources for relationships between intent and factual content.
  3. Evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind media presentation(s).
  4. Examine how values and viewpoints are included or excluded and how the media can influence beliefs, behaviors, and interpretations.
  5. Evaluate sources including advertisements, editorials, political cartoons, and feature stories for relationships between intent and factual content.
  6. Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information.
  7. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet when evaluating or producing creative or informational media messages.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.16

The student will apply social science skills to understand that in a democratic republic, thoughtful and effective participation in civic life is characterized by

  1. exercising personal character traits such as trustworthiness, responsibility, and honesty;
  2. obeying the law and paying taxes;
  3. serving as a juror;
  4. participating in the political process and voting in local, state, and national elections;
  5. performing public service;
  6. keeping informed about current issues;
  7. respecting differing opinions and the rights of others;
  8. practicing personal and fiscal responsibility;
  9. demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that foster the responsible and respectful use of digital media; and
  10. practicing patriotism.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, political, and cultural movements and changes in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century by

  1. explaining the factors that led to United States expansion;
  2. evaluating and explaining the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, the roles of Thurgood Marshall and Oliver W. Hill, Sr., and how Virginia responded to the decision;
  3. explaining how the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the 1963 March on Washington, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) had an impact on all Americans;
  4. analyzing changes in immigration policy and the impact of increased immigration;
  5. evaluating and explaining the foreign and domestic policies pursued by the American government after the Cold War;
  6. explaining how scientific and technological advances altered American lives; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the changes that occurred in American culture.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

Families First: Families Today

 

Families First: Meet the Challenge

 

Families First: You-Me-Us

 

Power of One: A Better You

 

Power of One: Family Ties

 

Power of One: Working on Working

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Career Investigation

 

Entrepreneurship

 

Focus on Children

 

Interpersonal Communications

 

National Programs in Action

 

Professional Presentation

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

4.5.4

Implement strategies for constructive and supportive interactions between children, youth and adults and their families and communities.