# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation Task 1967221101

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Define the roles, responsibilities, benefits, and limitations of recreation, leisure, and themed services jobs.

Definition

Definition of each career should include
  • description of the roles, duties, and responsibilities of professionals
  • explanation of the benefits of working as a professional
  • summary of the working conditions, including time commitment, encountered 
  • income expectations
  • career advancement opportunities
  • present and projected demand for workers on the local, state, and national levels.

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • What information is available concerning the identified careers?
  • What are the duties, education and training requirements, salary ranges, working conditions, and career advancement opportunities for professionals working in these careers?
  • What are the hiring expectations for recreation, leisure, and themed services jobs at the local, state, and national levels?
  • What characteristics and talents will lead to success in these careers?
  • What information is necessary to know about oneself to make wise career choices?
Communication
  • What communication skills are necessary for gathering and evaluating career information?
  • What communication skills are necessary in these identified careers?
Leadership
  • What leadership techniques can one use to gather and evaluate career information?
  • What leadership skills are needed to be successful in these careers?
  • What criteria should be used to evaluate these careers?
Management
  • What management skills are essential for effective career investigation and planning?
  • What resources are available to help evaluate career information?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Identify the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms, to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms, to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms, and literary and classical allusions in text.
  5. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

WHII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900 by

  1. explaining the roles of resources, capital, and entrepreneurship in developing an industrial economy;
  2. analyzing the effects of the Industrial Revolution on society and culture, with emphasis on the evolution of the nature of work and the labor force, including its effects on families and the status of women and children;
  3. describing how industrialization affected economic and political systems in Europe, with emphasis on the slave trade and the labor union movement;
  4. assessing the impact of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna on political power in Europe;
  5. explaining the events related to the unification of Italy and the role of Italian nationalism; and
  6. explaining the events related to the unification of Germany and the role of Bismarck.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA Competitive Events

Career Investigation

 

Check the national website for Skill Events

 

Check the national website for online events

 

Entrepreneurship

 

Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation

 

Illustrated Talk

 

Job Interview

 

Life Event Planning

 

National Programs in Action

 

FCCLA National Programs

A Better You

 

Earning

 

My Career

 

My Life

 

My Path

 

My Skills

 

Protecting

 

Saving

 

Spending

 

Working on Working

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

10.6

Demonstrate management of recreation, leisure, and other programs and events.