# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation Task 1967221091

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Cite historical events in the development of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries.

Definition

Citation of significant events should include types of hospitality services offered by
  • ancient Greece and Rome
  • public houses of the Middle Ages
  • 18th and 19th century American inns and hotels
  • modern facilities of today.

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • What are five significant events that occurred in the development of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries?
  • What types of hospitality services were offered in the past?
Communication
  • What services from the past are still available today?
  • Which facility designs of the past still influence contemporary design?
Leadership
  • How are leadership styles in the industry influenced by history?
  • What leadership skills help to apply the lessons of history to the present?
Management
  • How is knowledge from the industry's past helpful to current managers?
  • What current management strategies reflect the history and tradition of the hospitality industry?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

VUS.3

The student will apply social science skills to understand early European colonization by

  1. evaluating the economic characteristics of the colonies;
  2. analyzing how social and political factors impacted the culture of the colonies; and
  3. explaining the impact of the development of indentured servitude and slavery in the colonies.

VUS.6

The student will apply social science skills to understand major events in Virginia and United States history during the first half of the nineteenth century by

  1. explaining territorial expansion and its impact on the American Indians;
  2. describing the political results of territorial expansion;
  3. assessing the political and economic changes that occurred during this period, with emphasis on James Madison and the War of 1812;
  4. analyzing the social and cultural changes during the period, with emphasis on “the age of the common man” (Jacksonian Era);
  5. evaluating the cultural, economic, and political issues that divided the nation, including tariffs, slavery, the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements, and the role of the states in the Union.;
  6. explaining how Manifest Destiny and President James K. Polk’s policies impacted the nation; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the multiple causes and compromises leading to the Civil War, including the role of the institution of slavery.

VUS.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the emerging role of the United States in world affairs during the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by

  1. explaining changes in foreign policy of the United States toward Latin America and Asia and the growing influence of the United States, with emphasis on the impact of the Spanish-American War;
  2. evaluating the United States’ involvement in World War I, including Wilson’s Fourteen Points; and
  3. evaluating and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, with emphasis on the national debate in response to the League of Nations.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WHI.5

The student will apply social science skills to understand ancient Greece in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

  1. locating Greek civilizations in time and place and describing their major geographic features;
  2. describing the social and religious structure of ancient Greece;
  3. describing the cultural development of Athens and Sparta, with emphasis on the significance of citizenship and the development of democracy;
  4. evaluating the political and economic development of Greece, with emphasis on the Persian and  Peloponnesian wars;
  5. evaluating the significance of the conquest of Greece by Macedonia and the formation and spread of Hellenistic culture by Alexander the Great; and
  6. citing and explaining contributions in drama, poetry, history, sculpture, architecture, science, mathematics, and philosophy, with emphasis on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

WHI.6

The student will apply social science skills to understand ancient Rome from about 700 B.C. (B.C.E.) to 500 A.D. (C.E.) in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

  1. locating Roman civilizations in time and place and describing their major geographic features;
  2. describing the social and religious structure of ancient Rome;
  3. describing the social structure and cultural development of the Roman Republic;
  4. describing and evaluating the political and military structure of the Roman Republic under the rule of Julius Caesar;
  5. describing and evaluating the political structure of the Roman Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar;
  6. assessing the economic structure of Rome, Rome’s imperial conquests, and the Pax Romana; and
  7. evaluating the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the Germanic invasions.

WHI.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, economic, and political changes and cultural achievements in the high and late medieval periods by

  1. describing the emergence of centralized monarchies (England, France, Spain, and Russia) and distinctive political developments in each;
  2. explaining conflicts across Europe and Asia, including the Crusades and the fall of Constantinople;
  3. explaining patterns of crisis and recovery related to the Black Death (bubonic plague); and
  4. evaluating and explaining the preservation and transfer to Western Europe of Greek, Roman, and Arabic philosophy, medicine, and science.

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