# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Early Childhood, Education, and Services Task 1601165395

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Investigate federal, state, and other regulatory agencies monitoring the early childhood education industry.

Definition

Investigation should yield a report that
  • describes selected federal regulations and the monitoring practices that affect providers of early childhood education
  • identifies state-regulated childcare program types
    • Licensed day centers
    • Unlicensed but regulated
      • Voluntarily registered family day homes
      • Religiously exempt child day centers
      • Certified preschools
    • Approved by local ordinance (e.g., centers regulated by Arlington, Alexandria and Fairfax counties)
    • Unlicensed and unregulated
  • identifies the agencies that enforce these regulations
  • gives examples of how the regulations are carried out by local providers.

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • What are the federal, state, and local standards, policies, regulations, and laws related to working with children?
  • What are the legal and ethical consequences of meeting and of failing to meet standards for working with children?
  • How are standards enforced within the industry?
  • Who is responsible for monitoring childcare centers and preschools to ensure compliance?
  • Who will determine the appropriate teacher/student ratio standards in the classroom or the family child-care program? How will it determine how many teachers or assistant teachers are in the classroom?
  • What national association writes policy for the education of young children? What is their role in helping educators and families?
Communication
  • What practices ensure confidentiality?
  • How does one locate information on regulations regarding the early childhood education profession?
  • What national or state resources are available to help parents locate high-quality child care centers?
  • What agency rates childcare centers?
Leadership
  • What leadership skills are needed to demonstrate professional practices and standards?
  • How can professionals collaborate to meet the regulations of federal, state, and other accrediting institutions?
  • Is self-monitoring of standards within the industry in the best interest of the children?
  • Who would be most adversely affected by a failure to comply with child-related standards, policies, regulations, and laws?
Management
  • What record-keeping and management procedures are required by early childhood centers?
  • What steps should be taken to develop a plan for keeping and managing records of childcare employees and children?
  • What resources and training are needed to meet the requirements of the childcare educator?
  • Who will determine program eligibility for low-income families if needed, and how can that process be made easy for families?
  • What happens when childcare centers fail to meet minimum regulation standards?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

9.6

The student will write in a variety of forms to include expository, persuasive, reflective, and analytic with an emphasis on persuasion and analysis.
  1. Engage in writing as a recursive process.
  2. Plan, organize, and write for a variety of audiences and purposes.
  3. Objectively introduce and develop topics, incorporating evidence and maintaining an organized structure and a formal style.
  4. Blend multiple forms of writing including embedding a narrative to produce effective essays.
  5. Communicate clearly the purpose of the writing using a thesis statement.
  6. Compose a thesis for persuasive writing that advocates a position.
  7. Clearly state and defend a position using reasons and evidence from credible sources as support.
  8. Identify counterclaims and provide counter - arguments.
  9. Determine the best kind of evidence to use for a claim, and effectively use fact and opinion to support a position.
  10. Use textual evidence to compare and contrast multiple texts.
  11. Arrange paragraphs in a logical progression, using transitions between paragraphs and ideas.
  12. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy, and depth of information.

9.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the validity and accuracy of all information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to support claims and introduce counterclaims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased information using a standard method of documentation such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Avoid plagiarism by using own words and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

10.6

The student will write in a variety of forms to include persuasive, reflective, interpretive, and analytic with an emphasis on persuasion and analysis.
  1. Engage in writing as a recursive process.
  2. Plan and organize writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  3. Adjust writing content, technique, and voice for a variety of audiences and purposes.
  4. Communicate clearly the purpose of the writing using a thesis statement.
  5. Objectively introduce and develop topics, incorporating evidence and maintaining an organized structure and a formal style.
  6. Compose a thesis statement for persuasive writing that advocates a position.
  7. Clearly state and defend a position using reasons and sufficient evidence from credible sources as support.
  8. Identify counterclaims and provide counter - arguments.
  9. Show relationships among claims, reasons, and evidence and include a conclusion that follows logically from the information presented.
  10. Blend multiple forms of writing including embedding a narrative to produce effective essays.
  11. Elaborate ideas clearly through word choice.
  12. Use textual evidence to compare and contrast multiple texts.
  13. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy, and depth of information.
  14. Write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education.

10.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the accuracy, validity, and usefulness of information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to introduce counter claims and to support claims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

11.6

The student will write in a variety of forms, to include persuasive/argumentative, reflective, interpretive, and analytic with an emphasis on persuasion/argumentation.
  1. Apply components of a recursive writing process for multiple purposes to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  2. Produce arguments in writing developing a thesis that demonstrates knowledgeable judgments, addresses counterclaims, and provides effective conclusions.
  3. Organize claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a sustained and logical sequence.
  4. Adapt evidence, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation.
  5. Use words, phrases, clauses, and varied syntax to create a cohesive argument.
  6. Blend multiple forms of writing including embedding narratives to produce effective essays.
  7. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy and depth of information.
  8. Write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education.

11.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Critically evaluate quality, accuracy, and validity of information.
  2. Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view or bias.
  3. Synthesize relevant information from primary and secondary sources and present it in a logical sequence.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

12.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for Standard English.
  1. Use complex sentence structure to infuse sentence variety in writing.
  2. Edit, proofread, and prepare writing for intended audience and purpose.
  3. Use a style manual, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), to apply rules for punctuation and formatting of direct quotations.

12.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Frame, analyze, and synthesize information to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Critically evaluate the accuracy, quality, and validity of the information.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

History and Social Science

GOVT.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the organization and powers of the state and local governments described in the Constitution of Virginia by

  1. examining the legislative, executive, and judicial branches;
  2. examining the structure and powers of local governments (county, city, and town);
  3. analyzing the relationship between state and local governments and the roles of regional authorities, governing boards, and commissions;
  4. investigating and explaining the ways individuals and groups exert influence on state and local governments; and
  5. evaluating the effectiveness of citizen efforts to influence decisions of state and local governments by examining historical or contemporary events.

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

A Better You

 

Balancing Family and Career

 

Families Today

 

Family Ties

 

Meet the Challenge

 

Parent Practice

 

Working on Working

 

You-Me-Us

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Advocacy

 

Check the national website for Skill Events

 

Check the national website for online events

 

Entrepreneurship

 

Illustrated Talk

 

Interpersonal Communications

 

Life Event Planning

 

National Programs in Action

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

4.6.3

Implement federal, state, and local standards, policies, regulations, and laws that affect programs for children, youth and adults and their families.