# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Nutrition and Wellness Task 1144707149

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Explore factors that influence wellness and lifestyle practices across the lifespan.

Definition

Exploration should include

  • defining the term lifestyle
  • explaining the intellectual, psychological, emotional, cultural (ethnicity, family traditions/values), social (peer pressure), and spiritual influences on lifestyle behaviors
  • explaining choices that influence wellness, such as diet, meal patterns, exercise, rest and sleep, use of harmful substances, other risk behaviors, attitude, environment, gender, age, finances
  • explaining choices that contribute to wellness
  • identifying the stages and the nutritional needs of each stage across the lifespan
  • explaining the importance of variety and balance in food choices
  • explaining the relationship between food preparation and healthy food choices
  • identifying governmental, economic (media/advertising), and technological influences on food choices and other nutrition practices
  • explaining the amount of sleep, quality of sleep, and sleep patterns important to peak performance
  • defining the term substance abuse
  • identifying substances often abused by teens (e.g., alcohol, steroids, tobacco, caffeine, laxatives, inhalants, prescription medication, street drugs, energy or performance enhancers such as creatine)
  • determining effects that each substance listed above can have on the body and/or mind
  • identifying substance abuse prevention and rehabilitation strategies
  • explaining the relationship between risk or unsafe behaviors (e.g., not using seatbelt, speeding, multitasking while driving, excessive exposure to sun, regular exposure to loud music, and alcohol and other substance abuse) and wellness
  • explaining the relationship between financial health and physical and mental wellness (i.e., the effects of economic resources on one’s quality of nutrition, health care, sleep, stress level, and chronic disease prevention).

Teacher Resource: University of Utah Center for Student Wellness

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • Why should we be concerned with our lifestyle choices?
  • What factors may influence our lifestyle choices?
  • What are the consequences of making healthy choices for physical wellness?
  • What are some characteristics of physical, emotional, social, financial, vocational, mental, and spiritual wellness?
Communication
  • What communication skills do we need to analyze factors that contribute to wellness?
  • Where do we acquire our attitudes and beliefs about wellness and about lifestyle?
  • How does the media affect our ideas and choices about wellness and lifestyle?
Leadership
  • How can leaders help others to identify choices that contribute to wellness?
  • What areas of wellness are most important to your idea of personal success?
  • How are the wellness choices you make today similar to or different from those you will make five years from now? Twenty years from now?
Management
  • What are your current levels of exercise?
  • What steps can you take to increase exercise?
  • What happens when no exercise is involved?
  • Are you pleased with your present level of wellness? Why, or why not?
  • What information and resources do you need to improve your present level of wellness?
  • What steps should we take to evaluate our lifestyle choices?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.5

The student will analyze the characteristics of the regions of the United States and Canada by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2.  describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4.  recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.6

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Latin American and Caribbean regions by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WHII.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century by

  1. identifying contemporary political issues, with emphasis on migrations of refugees and others, ethnic/religious conflicts, and the impact of technology, including the role of social media and chemical and biological technologies;
  2. assessing the link between economic and political freedom;
  3. describing economic interdependence, including the rise of multinational corporations, international organizations, and trade agreements; and
  4. analyzing the increasing impact of terrorism.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

A Better You

 

Balancing Family and Career

 

Earning

 

Families Today

 

Family Ties

 

Lead

 

Learn

 

Meet the Challenge

 

Parent Practice

 

People

 

Protecting

 

Roads

 

Saving

 

Serve

 

Speak Out for FCCLA

 

Spending

 

Take the Lead

 

The Fit You

 

The Healthy You

 

The Real You

 

The Resilient You

 

Vehicles

 

Working on Working

 

You-Me-Us

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Advocacy

 

Chapter Service Project Display

 

Chapter in Review Display

 

Check the national website for Skill Events

 

Check the national website for online events

 

Culinary Arts

 

Focus on Children

 

Food Innovations

 

Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation

 

Illustrated Talk

 

Leadership

 

Life Event Planning

 

National Programs in Action

 

Nutrition and Wellness

 

Sports Nutrition

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

14.1.1

Explain physical, emotional, social, psychological, cultural, and spiritual components of individual and family wellness.