# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Nutrition and Wellness Task 1144707148

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Explain the relationship between nutrition and wellness.

Definition

Explanation should include
  • defining the term nutrition
  • defining the term wellness
  • identifying the components of wellness
    • physical
    • psychological
      • mental
      • emotional
      • intellectual
    • environmental
    • social
    • spiritual
    • occupational.

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • What are the components of nutrition?
  • What are the components of wellness? How does nutrition affect wellness?
  • How does wellness affect nutrition?
  • Why should nutrition and wellness information be evaluated periodically?
  • What resources are available for wellness?
  • What concepts overlap nutrition and wellness?
  • Why should a person reevaluate information regarding nutrition?
Communication
  • Where does one get information about nutrition and wellness?
  • How can the message about nutrition and wellness be delivered to our families, peers, and communities?
  • What role does media play in our nutritional information?
  • What consumer awareness media pieces could be created to inform communities on nutritional matters?
  • How does one keep up with changes in nutritional information?
Leadership
  • How can one provide leadership within the family unit regarding nutrition and wellness?
  • How can one advocate for community wellness programs?
Management
  • What are credible sources for nutritional information?
  • How can one use available information and resources to create a healthier you?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.12

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of the United States in a changing world by

  1. describing the responsibilities of the national government for foreign policy and national security;
  2. assessing the role of national interest in shaping foreign policy and promoting world peace; and
  3. examining the relationship of Virginia and the United States to the global economy, including trends in international trade.

GOVT.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand economic systems by

  1. identifying the basic economic questions encountered by all economic systems;
  2. comparing the characteristics of traditional, free market, command, and mixed economies, as described by Adam Smith and Karl Marx; and
  3. evaluating the impact of the government’s role in the economy on individual economic freedoms.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.7

The student will apply social science skills to understand of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras and their significance as major turning points in American history by

  1. describing major events and the roles of key leaders of the Civil War era, with emphasis on Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglass;
  2. evaluating and explaining the significance and development of Abraham Lincoln’s leadership and political statements, including the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation and the principles outlined in the Gettysburg Address;
  3. evaluating and explaining the impact of the war on Americans, with emphasis on Virginians, African Americans, the common soldier, and the home front;
  4. evaluating postwar Reconstruction plans presented by key leaders of the Civil War; and
  5. evaluating and explaining the political and economic impact of the war and Reconstruction, including the adoption of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States.

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.4

The student will apply social science skills to evaluate the significance of natural, human, and capital resources by

  1. comparing the distribution of major natural resources throughout world regions;
  2. showing the influence of resources on patterns of economic activity and land use; and
  3. evaluating perspectives regarding the use of resources.

WG.9

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Sub-Saharan African region by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.16

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the patterns of urban development by

  1. applying the concepts of site and situation to major cities in each region;
  2. explaining how the functions of towns and cities have changed over time; and
  3. describing the unique influence of urban areas and challenges they face.

WHI.6

The student will apply social science skills to understand ancient Rome from about 700 B.C. (B.C.E.) to 500 A.D. (C.E.) in terms of its impact on Western civilization by

  1. locating Roman civilizations in time and place and describing their major geographic features;
  2. describing the social and religious structure of ancient Rome;
  3. describing the social structure and cultural development of the Roman Republic;
  4. describing and evaluating the political and military structure of the Roman Republic under the rule of Julius Caesar;
  5. describing and evaluating the political structure of the Roman Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar;
  6. assessing the economic structure of Rome, Rome’s imperial conquests, and the Pax Romana; and
  7. evaluating the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the Germanic invasions.

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900 by

  1. explaining the roles of resources, capital, and entrepreneurship in developing an industrial economy;
  2. analyzing the effects of the Industrial Revolution on society and culture, with emphasis on the evolution of the nature of work and the labor force, including its effects on families and the status of women and children;
  3. describing how industrialization affected economic and political systems in Europe, with emphasis on the slave trade and the labor union movement;
  4. assessing the impact of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna on political power in Europe;
  5. explaining the events related to the unification of Italy and the role of Italian nationalism; and
  6. explaining the events related to the unification of Germany and the role of Bismarck.

WHII.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century by

  1. identifying contemporary political issues, with emphasis on migrations of refugees and others, ethnic/religious conflicts, and the impact of technology, including the role of social media and chemical and biological technologies;
  2. assessing the link between economic and political freedom;
  3. describing economic interdependence, including the rise of multinational corporations, international organizations, and trade agreements; and
  4. analyzing the increasing impact of terrorism.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

A Better You

 

Balancing Family and Career

 

Earning

 

Families Today

 

Family Ties

 

Meet the Challenge

 

Parent Practice

 

Speak Out for FCCLA

 

Spending

 

Take the Lead

 

The Fit You

 

The Healthy You

 

The Real You

 

The Resilient You

 

Working on Working

 

You-Me-Us

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Advocacy

 

Chapter Service Project Display

 

Check the national website for Skill Events

 

Culinary Arts

 

Focus on Children

 

Food Innovations

 

Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation

 

Illustrated Talk

 

Life Event Planning

 

National Programs in Action

 

Nutrition and Wellness

 

Sports Nutrition

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

14.2.1

Evaluate the effect of nutrition on health, wellness and performance.

14.2.2

Analyze the relationship of nutrition and wellness to individual and family health throughout the life span.