# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Nutrition and Wellness Task 107132972

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Identify the components of a standardized recipe.

Definition

Identification should include
  • food dish name or recipe title
  • category or type of recipe
  • equipment needed
  • preparation time
  • list of ingredients and quantity of each
  • step-by-step preparation instructions
  • cooking time and temperature(s)
  • yield and portion size
  • nutritional facts per serving (e.g., calories, fat grams, sodium, sugar, fiber).

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • What criteria should be used to determine whether a recipe is standardized?
  • What are the benefits of using a standardized recipe?
  • How do baking and cooking differ? When is a standardized recipe needed?
  • What factors determine a good recipe? What information is included?
  • How would the lack of knowledge of food preparation terms affect a cook’s ability to prepare a standard recipe?
  • Why are some recipe measurements given by weight and others by volume?
  • Why does it matter whether you use the ingredients list or the method as your instructions?
Communication
  • What strategies are used to share favorite recipes?
  • Why is it important to know your family members’ favorite recipes?
  • What communication skills are needed to provide detailed directions in a standardized recipe?
  • How should the information in a recipe be communicated?
Leadership
  • What strategies can be used to persuade your family to try new foods?
  • How can one invent a new recipe? Would it be an adaptation? What skills would aid in creating a new recipe?
  • What factors should be considered when adapting a recipe for special diets?
  • What role do standardized recipes play in maintaining product consistency?
  • What is the importance of examining the nutritional values information before planning to use a recipe?
  • What leadership skills are demonstrated when following a recipe?
  • What environmental factors might cause a recipe to fail?
Management
  • What new or unique foods can you find in the supermarket? How would you use these new or unique food products?
  • From how far away do your foods come? What is the impact on the environment when food is produced a long way from the consumers? What is the impact of using locally grown food products on the environment? On the economy?
  • How are recipes like formulas?
  • How can using standardized recipes increase efficiency in the commercial kitchen?
  • What might happen if the cook does not follow the recipe’s instructions exactly?
  • Where can we obtain the information we need for a standardized recipe?
  • What management skills are needed to select and prepare a recipe for an event?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

A Better You

 

Balancing Family and Career

 

Families Today

 

Family Ties

 

Meet the Challenge

 

Parent Practice

 

The Fit You

 

The Healthy You

 

The Real You

 

The Resilient You

 

You-Me-Us

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Check the national website for Skill Events

 

Check the national website for online events

 

Culinary Arts

 

Food Innovations

 

Illustrated Talk

 

National Programs in Action

 

Nutrition and Wellness

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

14.3.3

Demonstrate ability to select, store, prepare, and serve nutritious, aesthetically pleasing food and food product.