# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Nutrition and Wellness Task 107132960

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Analyze economic, environmental, and social determinants that influence food choices and other nutritional practices.

Definition

Analysis should include
  • identification of economic factors, such as globalization of food (importing and exporting of food products), industrialization, use of technology, government subsidies for food production, price controls, food supply, and food distribution
  • how these economic factors influence consumers' food choices and other nutritional practices
  • the identification of environmental factors such as climate, weather (e.g., hurricanes, wildfires) soil and air quality)
  • identification of practices to reduce food waste, practices to conserve energy and other resources, and practices to protect the environment (i.e., how environmental factors influence consumers' food choices and other nutritional practices)
  • the influence of social determinants (e.g., peer pressure, cultural and/or religious background).

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • Why should you be aware of economic and environmental factors that influence your food choices and other nutritional practices?
  • What would it be like if people ate food only for its nutritional value?
  • Which of the economic, environmental, and social factors are within your control?
Communication
  • What effect do cultural traditions, religious beliefs, family traditions, and peer pressures have on your food choices?
  • How much do economic factors influence your food choices and other nutritional practices? Are you less likely to choose foods based on cost rather than on nutritional value? Why, or why not?
  • How much do environmental factors influence your food choices and other nutritional practices? Does the origin of food (nearby, in another state, in another country) influence your choices? Why, or why not?
Leadership
  • What factors that influence your food choices and other nutritional practices are likely to be economic or environmental influenced? Why?
  • What economic and environmental factors should you consider as you strive to make healthy food choices?
  • What leadership skills can you use to help manage the economic and environmental factors that influence your food choices and other nutritional practices?
Management
  • What management skills can help us identify and analyze the influences on food choices?
  • How can consumers influence food providers to offer healthy food choices?
  • Which influences are most like to lead to unhealthy food choices? To healthy food choices?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand economic systems by

  1. identifying the basic economic questions encountered by all economic systems;
  2. comparing the characteristics of traditional, free market, command, and mixed economies, as described by Adam Smith and Karl Marx; and
  3. evaluating the impact of the government’s role in the economy on individual economic freedoms.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.5

The student will analyze the characteristics of the regions of the United States and Canada by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2.  describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4.  recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.6

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Latin American and Caribbean regions by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

WG.9

The student will analyze the characteristics of the Sub-Saharan African region by

  1. identifying and analyzing the location of major geographic regions and major cities on maps and globes;
  2. describing major physical and environmental features;
  3. explaining important economic characteristics; and
  4. recognizing cultural influences and landscapes.

Science

BIO.4

The student will investigate and understand life functions of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Key concepts include
  1. comparison of their metabolic activities;
  2. maintenance of homeostasis;
  3. how the structures and functions vary among and within the Eukarya kingdoms of protists, fungi, plants, and animals, including humans;
  4. human health issues, human anatomy, and body systems;
  5. how viruses compare with organisms; and
  6. evidence supporting the germ theory of infectious disease.

BIO.8

The student will investigate and understand dynamic equilibria within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Key concepts include
  1. interactions within and among populations, including carrying capacities, limiting factors, and growth curves;
  2. nutrient cycling with energy flow through ecosystems;
  3. succession patterns in ecosystems;
  4. the effects of natural events and human activities on ecosystems; and
  5. analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

A Better You

 

Balancing Family and Career

 

Earning

 

Families Today

 

Family Ties

 

Meet the Challenge

 

Parent Practice

 

Protecting

 

Saving

 

The Fit You

 

The Healthy You

 

The Real You

 

The Resilient You

 

Working on Working

 

You-Me-Us

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Advocacy

 

Check the national website for Skill Events

 

Check the national website for online events

 

Illustrated Talk

 

National Programs in Action

 

Nutrition and Wellness

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

14.3.4

Evaluate policies and practices that impact food security, sustainability, food integrity, and nutrition and wellness of individuals and families.

14.4.4

Investigate federal, state, and local inspection and labeling systems that protect the health of individuals and the public.

14.4.5

Analyze foodborne illness factors, including causes, potentially hazardous foods, and methods of prevention.