# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Nutrition and Wellness Task 1144707153

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe the effects of government policies and regulations on nutrition and wellness.

Definition

Description should include
  • applicable government policies and regulations
  • the impact of these policies and regulations on
    • nutritious food choices (e.g., ChooseMyPlate.gov, USDA dietary guidelines)
    • food purchases (e.g., taxes, processing regulations, salaries, transportation)
    • food distribution (e.g., food banks, Meals on Wheels, soup kitchens, international aid, food stamps, reduced-price and free breakfasts and lunches for school children, the USDA's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children [WIC])
    • food availability (e.g., access, safety)
    • food storage and preparation equipment (e.g., health regulations, Occupational Safety and Health Administration [OSHA] regulations).

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • Should the government be involved in nutrition and wellness issues? Why, or why not?
  • How do the government policies and regulations concerned with nutrition and wellness affect individuals, families, and society?
  • What are some areas of pending legislation related to nutrition and wellness?
  • What are the opinions of businesses, consumers, government representatives, and elected officials regarding the legislation?
Communication
  • How can we communicate the effectiveness of government policies and regulations on, for example, nutritious food choices?
  • Do you think the federal government has a responsibility to protect citizens from harmful products and practices related to nutrition and wellness? Why, or why not?
  • If you were a legislator, what information would you need to make the best choices about your vote on pending legislation related to nutrition and wellness?
Leadership
  • What responsibility does the government have to investigate and regulate food science and technology?
  • What food science and technology advances have government agencies regulated? Are these regulations fair to food producers, manufacturers, distributors, and consumers? Why, or why not?
  • How can consumers influence government policies and regulations on nutrition and wellness?
Management
  • How do government policies and regulations affect your choice of food preparation equipment and small appliances?
  • How are our food purchases affected by government regulation? Do regulations lead to increased cost of food products? Why, or why not?
  • How does government involvement affect the management of restaurants and other food service providers?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

Community Service: Lead

 

Community Service: Learn

 

Community Service: Serve

 

Families First: Families Today

 

Families First: Meet the Challenge

 

Families First: Parent Practice

 

Families First: You-Me-Us

 

Financial Fitness: Earning

 

Financial Fitness: Protecting

 

Financial Fitness: Saving

 

Financial Fitness: Spending

 

Power of One: A Better You

 

Power of One: Family Ties

 

Power of One: Working on Working

 

Student Body: The Fit You

 

Student Body: The Healthy You

 

Student Body: The Real You

 

Student Body: The Resilient You

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Chapter Service Project Display

 

National Programs in Action

 

Nutrition and Wellness

 

Professional Presentation

 

Public Policy Advocate

 

Sustainability Challenge

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

14.1.5

Analyze legislation and regulations related to nutrition and wellness.

14.3.3

Demonstrate ability to select, store, prepare, and serve nutritious, aesthetically pleasing food and food product.

14.3.4

Evaluate policies and practices that impact food security, sustainability, food integrity, and nutrition and wellness of individuals and families.

14.4.6

Analyze current consumer information about food safety and sanitation.