# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Nutrition and Wellness Task 107132977

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Explain the conditions that promote the growth of food-borne pathogens.

Definition

Explanation should include the following conditions, often referred to as the FAT-TOM factors in food safety:
  • Food: Foods with no protein content tend to be less perishable, whereas foods high in protein, like meat or eggs, encourage rapid growth of bacteria.
  • Acidity: Neutral or acidic foods tend to exhibit slow bacteria growth, whereas foods with a pH above 7.0 tend to encourage rapid reproduction of bacteria.
  • Time: Perishable food should never stay in the temperature danger zone longer than two hours. Also, packaging dates are important because they are a factor in determining a product’s intended shelf life.
  • Temperature: Perishable and semiperishable foods should be stored below 41°F until they are cooked.
  • Oxygen: A lack of oxygen protects perishable and semiperishable foods from aerobic bacterial growth; however, the common food "poison" called botulism is anaerobic and therefore can thrive in an oxygen-free environment, such as a sealed can or jar.
  • Moisture: Dried foods and foods preserved with salt or sugar are likely to be safer from bacterial growth than moist foods.

Teacher Resources: Virginia Food Handlers; Iowa State University Food Safety; Who is FAT-TOM?

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • How do you reduce the probability of bacterial growth in food?
  • Which of the following food items would be more susceptible to bacterial growth than others, and why: apple, cracker, milk, pizza, hot dog, hamburger, salad?
Communication
  • When have you observed violations of FAT-TOM conditions?
  • How can you make family members aware of safe food-handling practices?
Leadership
  • Who is responsible for seeing that the FAT-TOM conditions are being met in the home kitchen?
  • What should you do if you see safe-food violations in a food-service establishment?
Management
  • Where could you find resources on safe food-handling practices?
  • What are the consequences of consuming improperly handled food?
  • Where could you find information on the health inspections for local food establishments?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

Science

BIO.4

The student will investigate and understand life functions of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Key concepts include
  1. comparison of their metabolic activities;
  2. maintenance of homeostasis;
  3. how the structures and functions vary among and within the Eukarya kingdoms of protists, fungi, plants, and animals, including humans;
  4. human health issues, human anatomy, and body systems;
  5. how viruses compare with organisms; and
  6. evidence supporting the germ theory of infectious disease.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

Families First: Families Today

 

Families First: Meet the Challenge

 

Power of One: A Better You

 

Student Body: The Fit You

 

Student Body: The Healthy You

 

Student Body: The Real You

 

Student Body: The Resilient You

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Culinary Arts

 

Event Management

 

National Programs in Action

 

Professional Presentation

 

Public Policy Advocate

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

14.4.1

Analyze conditions and practices that promote safe food handling.

14.4.2

Analyze safety and sanitation practices.

14.4.5

Analyze foodborne illness factors, including causes, potentially hazardous foods, and methods of prevention.