# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Nutrition and Wellness Task 107132959

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Investigate community and national topics related to nutrition and wellness.

Definition

Investigation may include such topics as
  • hunger (e.g., problems involving malnutrition, chronic undernutrition, seasonal undernutrition, malabsorptive hunger, famine)
  • the effects of economic distress and/or homelessness
  • obesity
  • food supply and distribution (e.g., food deserts)
  • food safety
  • food security
  • environmental influences on food supply and water quality
  • sustainable food systems, green technology, and hydroponic and other alternative techniques for food production.

Teacher Resource: VSU Unveils Food Desert Study Findings

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • Why are nutrition and wellness issues frequently in the news?
  • What are the consequences of nutrition and wellness issues for you and your family?
  • What economic forces influence nutrition and wellness?
Communication
  • What factors determine nutrition and wellness of people across the globe?
  • How has the analysis of factors influencing nutrition and wellness changed over time?
  • In what ways does the use of communication technology influence food choices of people in other countries?
Leadership
  • What skills do we need to explore societal, governmental, socioeconomic, and technological influences related to nutrition and wellness?
  • Whose responsibility is it to address community and national issues of nutrition and wellness?
  • What leadership skills do we need to contribute to the resolution of nutrition and wellness issues?
  • What ethical issues are involved in addressing nutrition and wellness issues? For example, what happens when governments do not distribute food aid to those who need it? What can be done to ensure that people who need food the most will receive it?
Management
  • What are the short-term and long-term consequences of food technology on the global community?
  • What new perspectives have you gained from analyzing community and national issues related to nutrition and wellness?
  • What resources do we need to analyze and address these issues?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

9.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the validity and accuracy of all information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to support claims and introduce counterclaims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased information using a standard method of documentation such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Avoid plagiarism by using own words and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

10.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the accuracy, validity, and usefulness of information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to introduce counter claims and to support claims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

11.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Critically evaluate quality, accuracy, and validity of information.
  2. Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view or bias.
  3. Synthesize relevant information from primary and secondary sources and present it in a logical sequence.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

12.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Frame, analyze, and synthesize information to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Critically evaluate the accuracy, quality, and validity of the information.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

History and Social Science

GOVT.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand economic systems by

  1. identifying the basic economic questions encountered by all economic systems;
  2. comparing the characteristics of traditional, free market, command, and mixed economies, as described by Adam Smith and Karl Marx; and
  3. evaluating the impact of the government’s role in the economy on individual economic freedoms.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

Science

BIO.4

The student will investigate and understand life functions of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Key concepts include
  1. comparison of their metabolic activities;
  2. maintenance of homeostasis;
  3. how the structures and functions vary among and within the Eukarya kingdoms of protists, fungi, plants, and animals, including humans;
  4. human health issues, human anatomy, and body systems;
  5. how viruses compare with organisms; and
  6. evidence supporting the germ theory of infectious disease.

BIO.8

The student will investigate and understand dynamic equilibria within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Key concepts include
  1. interactions within and among populations, including carrying capacities, limiting factors, and growth curves;
  2. nutrient cycling with energy flow through ecosystems;
  3. succession patterns in ecosystems;
  4. the effects of natural events and human activities on ecosystems; and
  5. analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

Community Service: Lead

 

Community Service: Learn

 

Community Service: Serve

 

Families First: Balancing Family and Career

 

Families First: Families Today

 

Families First: Meet the Challenge

 

Families First: Parent Practice

 

Financial Fitness: Earning

 

Financial Fitness: Protecting

 

Financial Fitness: Saving

 

Financial Fitness: Spending

 

Power of One: A Better You

 

Power of One: Family Ties

 

Power of One: Working on Working

 

Student Body: The Fit You

 

Student Body: The Healthy You

 

Student Body: The Real You

 

Student Body: The Resilient You

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Chapter Service Project Display

 

Focus on Children

 

National Programs in Action

 

Nutrition and Wellness

 

Professional Presentation

 

Public Policy Advocate

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

14.3.4

Evaluate policies and practices that impact food security, sustainability, food integrity, and nutrition and wellness of individuals and families.

14.4.4

Investigate federal, state, and local inspection and labeling systems that protect the health of individuals and the public.