# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Independent Living Task 1100235287

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Evaluate sources of consumer information.

Definition

Sources of consumer information may include

  • government or community agencies (e.g., Federal Trade Commission, Consumer Protection Agency)
  • consumer-oriented publications (e.g., newspaper articles, Consumer Reports, Consumer Research)
  •  advice from others (e.g., family, friends, experts, sales staff, online reviews)
  • point-of-purchase sources (e.g., labels, packages, displays)
  • media (e.g., television programs, podcasts, e-mail, websites)
  • advertising (e.g., print, television, radio, Internet).

Evaluation should include answering the following questions for each source identified:

  • Why do you find the author or source of information reputable? Believable? If you do not, why not?
  • What are the credentials of the author or source of information?
  • Where and when was the information published?
  • What does the source have to gain by promoting the information?
  • How the information presented? Is it presented in a logical way and supported by valid research?
  • How many valid sources support the same information?

Process/Skill Questions

Thinking
  • What types of information do you need to make responsible consumer decisions?
  • How can the information from the sources listed above be used to make decisions for yourself? For your family?
  • What can happen when consumers buy products but ignore the label information or manufacturer’s instructions?
Communication
  • What questions do you have after reviewing your sources?
  • What questions should you ask before making a purchase?
  • What sources of information are you apt to use most often? Why?
  • When are consumers most likely to ignore consumer information?
Leadership
  • When do you consider advertising to be a reliable source of consumer information? Why or why not?
  • How can you determine if an Internet source is reliable or not?
  • How can leadership skills help you understand advertising strategies and make informed buying decisions?
  • How much do you think advertising influences teenage consumers? Adult consumers? Young children?
  • How much do you think advice from others influences these consumers? Why?
Management
  • How can you use the management process to evaluate sources of consumer information?
  • What questions stated in the task definition above are the most important in determining the reliability of a source of consumer information? The least important? Why?
  • How can you improve your buying habits?
  • Why is it important to be a responsible consumer, for yourself and for your family?

Related Standards of Learning

English

8.6

The student will read, comprehend, and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  2. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to analyze selections.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview or locate information.
  4. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  5. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, word choice, and impact.
  6. Analyze details for relevance and accuracy.
  7. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  8. Identify the main idea.
  9. Summarize the text identifying supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Evaluate, organize, and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

8.9

The student will find, evaluate, select, and synthesize appropriate resources to produce a research product.
  1. Formulate and revise questions about a research topic.
  2. Collect and synthesize information from multiple sources.
  3. Evaluate and analyze the validity and credibility of resources.
  4. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  5. Cite primary and secondary sources using Modern Language Association (MLA) or American Psychological Association (APA) style.
  6. Quote, summarize and paraphrase research findings.
  7. Publish findings and respond to feedback.
  8. Avoid plagiarism by using own words and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  9. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

9.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the validity and accuracy of all information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to support claims and introduce counterclaims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased information using a standard method of documentation such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Avoid plagiarism by using own words and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

10.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the accuracy, validity, and usefulness of information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to introduce counter claims and to support claims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

11.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Critically evaluate quality, accuracy, and validity of information.
  2. Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view or bias.
  3. Synthesize relevant information from primary and secondary sources and present it in a logical sequence.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

12.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Frame, analyze, and synthesize information to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Critically evaluate the accuracy, quality, and validity of the information.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

Mathematics

8.4

The student will solve practical problems involving consumer applications.

8.12

The student will
  1. represent numerical data in boxplots;
  2. make observations and inferences about data represented in boxplots; and
  3. compare and analyze two data sets using boxplots.

8.13

The student will
  1. represent data in scatterplots;
  2. make observations about data represented in scatterplots; and
  3. use a drawing to estimate the line of best fit for data represented in a scatterplot.

AII.1

The student will
  1. add, subtract, multiply, divide, and simplify rational algebraic expressions;
  2. add, subtract, multiply, divide, and simplify radical expressions containing rational numbers and variables, and expressions containing rational exponents; and
  3. factor polynomials completely in one or two variables.

Other Related Standards

FCCLA National Programs

Families First: Meet the Challenge

 

Financial Fitness: Earning

 

Financial Fitness: Protecting

 

Financial Fitness: Saving

 

Financial Fitness: Spending

 

Power of One: A Better You

 

Power of One: Take the Lead

 

FCCLA: STAR Events (2019)

Entrepreneurship

 

Event Management

 

Leadership

 

National Programs in Action

 

Professional Presentation

 

Public Policy Advocate

 

National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education

2.3.3

Apply skills to seek information regarding consumer rights.

2.4.2

Analyze how media and technological advances influence family and consumer decisions.

3.2.6

Analyze the role of media in consumer advocacy.