CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Develop a historic timeline of milestones in genomics.

Definition

Development of the timeline should include, but not be limited to, major events in genetic engineering such as

  • Mendel's discovery
  • DNA sequencing technologies
  • gene therapy
  • cloning
  • gene editing
  • PCR.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What was Mendel's contribution to the field of genetic engineering?
  • What is the importance of DNA modeling?
  • What is the importance of gene therapy in modern medicine?
  • What is cloning, and why is it controversial?

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.6

The student will write in a variety of forms to include persuasive, reflective, interpretive, and analytic with an emphasis on persuasion and analysis.
  1. Engage in writing as a recursive process.
  2. Plan and organize writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  3. Adjust writing content, technique, and voice for a variety of audiences and purposes.
  4. Communicate clearly the purpose of the writing using a thesis statement.
  5. Objectively introduce and develop topics, incorporating evidence and maintaining an organized structure and a formal style.
  6. Compose a thesis statement for persuasive writing that advocates a position.
  7. Clearly state and defend a position using reasons and sufficient evidence from credible sources as support.
  8. Identify counterclaims and provide counter - arguments.
  9. Show relationships among claims, reasons, and evidence and include a conclusion that follows logically from the information presented.
  10. Blend multiple forms of writing including embedding a narrative to produce effective essays.
  11. Elaborate ideas clearly through word choice.
  12. Use textual evidence to compare and contrast multiple texts.
  13. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy, and depth of information.
  14. Write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education.

10.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraphing, and Standard English.
  1. Use parallel structure across sentences and paragraphs.
  2. Use complex sentence structure to infuse sentence variety in writing.
  3. Distinguish between active and passive voice.
  4. Use colons correctly.
  5. Analyze the writing of others and suggest how writing might be improved.

10.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the accuracy, validity, and usefulness of information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to introduce counter claims and to support claims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

11.6

The student will write in a variety of forms, to include persuasive/argumentative, reflective, interpretive, and analytic with an emphasis on persuasion/argumentation.
  1. Apply components of a recursive writing process for multiple purposes to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  2. Produce arguments in writing developing a thesis that demonstrates knowledgeable judgments, addresses counterclaims, and provides effective conclusions.
  3. Organize claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a sustained and logical sequence.
  4. Adapt evidence, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation.
  5. Use words, phrases, clauses, and varied syntax to create a cohesive argument.
  6. Blend multiple forms of writing including embedding narratives to produce effective essays.
  7. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy and depth of information.
  8. Write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education.

11.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraphing, and Standard English.
  1. Use complex sentence structure to infuse sentence variety in writing.
  2. Use verbals and verbal phrases correctly to achieve sentence conciseness and variety.
  3. Distinguish between active and passive voice.

11.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Critically evaluate quality, accuracy, and validity of information.
  2. Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view or bias.
  3. Synthesize relevant information from primary and secondary sources and present it in a logical sequence.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

12.6

The student will write in a variety of forms to include persuasive/argumentative reflective, interpretive, and analytic with an emphasis on persuasion/argumentation.
  1. Apply components of a recursive writing process for multiple purposes to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  2. Produce arguments in writing that develop a thesis to demonstrate knowledgeable judgments, address counterclaims, and provide effective conclusions.
  3. Use a variety of rhetorical strategies to clarify and defend a position organizing claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a sustained and logical sequence.
  4. Blend multiple forms of writing including embedding a narrative to produce effective essays.
  5. Adapt evidence, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation.
  6. Use words, phrases, clauses, and varied syntax to connect all parts of the argument creating cohesion from the information presented.
  7. Revise writing for clarity of content, depth of information, and technique of presentation.
  8. Write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education.
  9. Write to clearly describe personal qualifications for potential occupational or educational opportunities.

12.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for Standard English.
  1. Use complex sentence structure to infuse sentence variety in writing.
  2. Edit, proofread, and prepare writing for intended audience and purpose.
  3. Use a style manual, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), to apply rules for punctuation and formatting of direct quotations.

12.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Frame, analyze, and synthesize information to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Critically evaluate the accuracy, quality, and validity of the information.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

History and Social Science

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand of the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts by

  1. describing the struggles for self-rule, including Gandhi’s leadership in India and the development of India’s democracy;
  2. describing Africa’s independence movements, including Jomo Kenyatta’s leadership of Kenya and Nelson Mandela’s role in South Africa; and
  3. describing the end of the mandate system and the creation of states in the Middle East, including the roles of Golda Meir and Gamal Abdel Nasser.

WHII.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century by

  1. identifying contemporary political issues, with emphasis on migrations of refugees and others, ethnic/religious conflicts, and the impact of technology, including the role of social media and chemical and biological technologies;
  2. assessing the link between economic and political freedom;
  3. describing economic interdependence, including the rise of multinational corporations, international organizations, and trade agreements; and
  4. analyzing the increasing impact of terrorism.

Science

BIO.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. observations of living organisms are recorded in the lab and in the field;
  2. hypotheses are formulated based on direct observations and information from scientific literature;
  3. variables are defined and investigations are designed to test hypotheses;
  4. graphing and arithmetic calculations are used as tools in data analysis;
  5. conclusions are formed based on recorded quantitative and qualitative data;
  6. sources of error inherent in experimental design are identified and discussed;
  7. validity of data is determined;
  8. chemicals and equipment are used in a safe manner;
  9. appropriate technology including computers, graphing calculators, and probeware is used for gathering and analyzing data, communicating results, modeling concepts, and simulating experimental conditions;
  10. research utilizes scientific literature;
  11. differentiation is made among a scientific hypothesis, theory, and law;
  12. alternative scientific explanations and models are recognized and analyzed; and
  13. current applications of biological concepts are used.

BIO.5

The student will investigate and understand common mechanisms of inheritance and protein synthesis. Key concepts include
  1. cell growth and division;
  2. gamete formation;
  3. cell specialization;
  4. prediction of inheritance of traits based on the Mendelian laws of heredity;
  5. historical development of the structural model of DNA;
  6. genetic variation;
  7. the structure, function, and replication of nucleic acids;
  8. events involved in the construction of proteins;
  9. use, limitations, and misuse of genetic information; and
  10. exploration of the impact of DNA technologies.

Other Related Standards

The National Council for Agricultural Education: Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Content Standards

BS.01.01. Investigate and explain the relationship between past, current, and emerging applications of biotechnology in agriculture (e.g., major innovators, historical developments, potential applications of biotechnology, etc.).