CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Summarize the role of biotechnology in plant and/or animal modification.

Definition

Summary should be made by examining an example of the
  • production and use of biodegradable pesticides, herbicide-resistant crops, and fertilizers
  • DNA marker technology for plant and animal breeding
  • development of pathogen-resistant and insect-resistant plants
  • development of plant and animal byproducts.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What are some examples of genetically modified organisms that are used to support crop production?
  • What innovations are the result of plant modification?
  • What uses and applications do genetically modified plants and/or animals currently have?

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.17

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the impact of globalization by

  1. identifying factors, including comparative advantage, that influence the distribution of economic activities and trade;
  2. describing ways that economic and social interactions change over time; and
  3. mapping, describing, and evaluating economic unions.

WG.18

The student will apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface by

  1. explaining and evaluating reasons for the creation of different political divisions; and
  2. describing ways cooperation among political jurisdictions is used to solve problems and settle disputes.

Science

BIO.5

The student will investigate and understand common mechanisms of inheritance and protein synthesis. Key concepts include
  1. cell growth and division;
  2. gamete formation;
  3. cell specialization;
  4. prediction of inheritance of traits based on the Mendelian laws of heredity;
  5. historical development of the structural model of DNA;
  6. genetic variation;
  7. the structure, function, and replication of nucleic acids;
  8. events involved in the construction of proteins;
  9. use, limitations, and misuse of genetic information; and
  10. exploration of the impact of DNA technologies.

Other Related Standards

The National Council for Agricultural Education: Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Content Standards

BS.03.04. Apply biotechnology principles, techniques, and processes to enhance plant and animal care and production (e.g., selective breeding, pharmaceuticals, biodiversity, etc.).