CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Demonstrate safe laboratory procedures.

Definition

Demonstration should
  • reflect a knowledge of hazards and general safety rules (e.g., those related to fire, electricity, infection prevention, transmission of diseases), aseptic technique, and industry-specified guidelines (e.g., Occupational Safety and Health Administration [OSHA] and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment [CLIA])
  • interpret safety data sheets (SDS)
  • follow manufacturers' guidelines for equipment and material use
  • include safety procedures related to the use, storage, and disposal of sharps, hazardous materials, biohazards, and other items
  • include wearing personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • identify biosafety levels (e.g., of microorganisms)
    • BSL1
    • BSL2
    • BSL3
    • BSL4.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What are specific rules and procedures involved in aseptic technique?
  • Why are aseptic rules important?
  • What are the components of the chain of infection? Why is it important?
  • What are appropriate cleanup procedures for hazardous materials?
  • What is an SDS? Why is it important?
  • Why is documentation important to safety?

Related Standards of Learning

History and Social Science

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

GOVT.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand civil liberties and civil rights by

  1. examining the Bill of Rights, with emphasis on First Amendment freedoms;
  2. analyzing due process of law expressed in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments;
  3. explaining how the Supreme Court has applied most of the protections of the Bill of Rights to the states through a process of selective incorporation;
  4. investigating and evaluating the balance between individual liberties and the public interest; and
  5. examining how civil liberties and civil rights are protected under the law.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

GOVT.16

The student will apply social science skills to understand that in a democratic republic, thoughtful and effective participation in civic life is characterized by

  1. exercising personal character traits such as trustworthiness, responsibility, and honesty;
  2. obeying the law and paying taxes;
  3. serving as a juror;
  4. participating in the political process and voting in local, state, and national elections;
  5. performing public service;
  6. keeping informed about current issues;
  7. respecting differing opinions and the rights of others;
  8. practicing personal and fiscal responsibility;
  9. demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that foster the responsible and respectful use of digital media; and
  10. practicing patriotism.

Science

BIO.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. observations of living organisms are recorded in the lab and in the field;
  2. hypotheses are formulated based on direct observations and information from scientific literature;
  3. variables are defined and investigations are designed to test hypotheses;
  4. graphing and arithmetic calculations are used as tools in data analysis;
  5. conclusions are formed based on recorded quantitative and qualitative data;
  6. sources of error inherent in experimental design are identified and discussed;
  7. validity of data is determined;
  8. chemicals and equipment are used in a safe manner;
  9. appropriate technology including computers, graphing calculators, and probeware is used for gathering and analyzing data, communicating results, modeling concepts, and simulating experimental conditions;
  10. research utilizes scientific literature;
  11. differentiation is made among a scientific hypothesis, theory, and law;
  12. alternative scientific explanations and models are recognized and analyzed; and
  13. current applications of biological concepts are used.

CH.1

The student will investigate and understand that experiments in which variables are measured, analyzed, and evaluated produce observations and verifiable data. Key concepts include
  1. designated laboratory techniques;
  2. safe use of chemicals and equipment;
  3. proper response to emergency situations;
  4. manipulation of multiple variables, using repeated trials;
  5. accurate recording, organization, and analysis of data through repeated trials;
  6. mathematical and procedural error analysis;
  7. mathematical manipulations including SI units, scientific notation, linear equations, graphing, ratio and proportion, significant digits, and dimensional analysis;
  8. use of appropriate technology including computers, graphing calculators, and probeware for gathering data, communicating results, and using simulations to model concepts;
  9. construction and defense of a scientific viewpoint; and
  10. the use of current applications to reinforce chemistry concepts.

Other Related Standards

The National Council for Agricultural Education: Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Content Standards

BS.02.01. Read, document, evaluate, and secure accurate laboratory records of experimental protocols, observations, and results.

 

BS.02.02. Implement standard operating procedures for the proper maintenance, use, and sterilization of equipment in a laboratory.

 

BS.02.03. Apply standard operating procedures for the safe handling of biological and chemical materials in a laboratory.

 

BS.02.04. Safely manage and dispose of biological materials, chemicals, and wastes according to standard operating procedures.