CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe leadership characteristics and opportunities as they relate to agriculture and FFA.

Definition

Description should include

  • examples of successful leaders
  • types of leadership
    • autocratic
    • participative
    • laissez-faire
    • servant
    • followership
  • positive leadership qualities and traits of successful leaders
  • opportunities for participating in leadership activities in FFA
  • demonstrating methods for conducting an effective meeting.

Process/Skill Questions

  • Who are some successful leaders in the agriculture industry?
  • What qualities make a successful leader?
  • What are leadership traits?
  • What is the difference between positive and negative leadership?

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

VUS.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the emerging role of the United States in world affairs during the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by

  1. explaining changes in foreign policy of the United States toward Latin America and Asia and the growing influence of the United States, with emphasis on the impact of the Spanish-American War;
  2. evaluating the United States’ involvement in World War I, including Wilson’s Fourteen Points; and
  3. evaluating and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, with emphasis on the national debate in response to the League of Nations.

VUS.10

The student will apply social science skills to understand key events during the 1920s and 1930s by

  1. analyzing how popular culture evolved and challenged traditional values;
  2. assessing and explaining the economic causes and consequences of the stock market crash of 1929;
  3. explaining the causes of the Great Depression and its impact on the American people; and
  4. evaluating and explaining how Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal measures addressed the Great Depression and expanded the government’s role in the economy.

VUS.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II by

  1. analyzing the causes and events that led to American involvement in the war, including the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the American response;
  2. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the European theater;
  3. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the Pacific theater;
  4. evaluating and explaining how the United States mobilized its economic and military resources, including the role of all-minority military units (the Tuskegee Airmen and Nisei regiments) and the contributions of media, minorities, and women to the war effort;
  5. analyzing the Holocaust (Hitler’s “final solution”), its impact on Jews and other groups, and the postwar trials of war criminals; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the treatment of prisoners of war and civilians by the Allied and Axis powers.

WHII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900 by

  1. explaining the roles of resources, capital, and entrepreneurship in developing an industrial economy;
  2. analyzing the effects of the Industrial Revolution on society and culture, with emphasis on the evolution of the nature of work and the labor force, including its effects on families and the status of women and children;
  3. describing how industrialization affected economic and political systems in Europe, with emphasis on the slave trade and the labor union movement;
  4. assessing the impact of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna on political power in Europe;
  5. explaining the events related to the unification of Italy and the role of Italian nationalism; and
  6. explaining the events related to the unification of Germany and the role of Bismarck.

WHII.10

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War I and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining economic and political causes and identifying major leaders of the war, with emphasis on Woodrow Wilson and Kaiser Wilhelm II;
  2. describing the location of major battles and the role of new technologies;
  3. analyzing and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the actions of the League of Nations, with emphasis on the mandate system;
  4. citing causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution;
  5. explaining the causes and assessing the impact of worldwide depression in the 1930s; and
  6. examining the rise of totalitarianism.

WHII.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining the major causes of the war;
  2. describing the leaders of the war, with emphasis on Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Hirohito;
  3. describing the major events, including major battles and the role of new technologies;
  4. examining the Holocaust and other examples of genocide in the twentieth century; and
  5. examining the effects of the war, with emphasis on the terms of the peace, the war crimes trials, the division of Europe, plans to rebuild Germany and Japan, and the creation of international cooperative organizations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948).