# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Ecology and Environmental Management Task 1090168882

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Determine the sources and effects of acid rain.

Definition

Determination should include
  • an illustration of acid rain production
  • local, national, and global areas where acid rain is more significant
  • the correlation of acid rain destruction with the amount of its production
  • how quickly Earth can recover when corrective measures are put in place.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What is acid rain?
  • What does acid rain do?
  • How is acid rain destructive to a concentrated area, or are its effects far-reaching? Explain.

Related Standards of Learning

English

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

WG.2

The student will analyze how physical and ecological processes shape Earth’s surface by

  1. explaining regional climatic patterns and weather phenomena and their effects on people and places;
  2. describing how humans influence the environment and are influenced by it; and
  3. explaining how technology affects one's ability to modify the environment and adapt to it.

WG.3

The student will apply the concept of a region by

  1. explaining how characteristics of regions have led to regional labels;
  2. describing how regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants;
  3. analyzing how cultural characteristics, including the world’s major languages, ethnicities, and religions, link or divide regions;
  4. explaining how different cultures use maps and place names to reflect their regional perspectives; and
  5. developing and refining mental maps of world regions.

WG.17

The student will apply social science skills to analyze the impact of globalization by

  1. identifying factors, including comparative advantage, that influence the distribution of economic activities and trade;
  2. describing ways that economic and social interactions change over time; and
  3. mapping, describing, and evaluating economic unions.

WG.18

The student will apply social science skills to analyze how forces of conflict and cooperation affect the division and control of Earth’s surface by

  1. explaining and evaluating reasons for the creation of different political divisions; and
  2. describing ways cooperation among political jurisdictions is used to solve problems and settle disputes.

Science

ES.11

The student will investigate and understand the origin and evolution of the atmosphere and the interrelationship of geologic processes, biologic processes, and human activities on its composition and dynamics. Key concepts include
  1. scientific evidence for atmospheric composition changes over geologic time;
  2. current theories related to the effects of early life on the chemical makeup of the atmosphere;
  3. atmospheric regulation mechanisms, including the effects of density differences and energy transfer; and
  4. potential changes to the atmosphere and climate due to human, biologic, and geologic activity.