# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Ecology and Environmental Management Task 1090168863

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Illustrate geometric vs. arithmetic increases in population growth.

Definition

Illustration should include
  • use of the J-Curve to show population growth as exponential
  • illustration of typical prey vs. predatory species growth curves.

Process/Skill Questions

  • How would one interpret a J-Curve?
  • What is the value of showing population growth in a J-Curve as exponential?

Related Standards of Learning

History and Social Science

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.2

The student will apply social science skills to understand the impact of the Age of Exploration by

  1. describing the characteristics of early exploration and evaluating the impact of European settlement in the Americas; and
  2. analyzing the cultural interactions among American Indians, Europeans, and Africans.

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.14

The student will apply social science skills to compare and contrast the distribution, growth rates, and characteristics of human population by

  1. examining demographic data to determine the relative level of development;
  2. distinguishing between developed and developing countries; and
  3. comparing and contrasting the level of economic development to the standard of living and quality of life.

WG.15

The student will apply social science skills to analyze past and present trends in human migration and cultural diffusion by

  1. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion are influenced by social, economic, political, and environmental factors and
  2. determining how human migration and cultural diffusion influence the current human characteristics of places and regions.

WHI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the changes in European nations between 1800 and 1900 by

  1. explaining the roles of resources, capital, and entrepreneurship in developing an industrial economy;
  2. analyzing the effects of the Industrial Revolution on society and culture, with emphasis on the evolution of the nature of work and the labor force, including its effects on families and the status of women and children;
  3. describing how industrialization affected economic and political systems in Europe, with emphasis on the slave trade and the labor union movement;
  4. assessing the impact of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna on political power in Europe;
  5. explaining the events related to the unification of Italy and the role of Italian nationalism; and
  6. explaining the events related to the unification of Germany and the role of Bismarck.

Mathematics

AFDA.1

The student will investigate and analyze linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic function families and their characteristics. Key concepts include
  1. domain and range;
  2. intervals in which the function is increasing or decreasing;
  3. absolute maxima and minima;
  4. zeros;
  5. intercepts;
  6. values of a function for elements in its domain;
  7. connections between and among multiple representations of functions using verbal descriptions, tables, equations, and graphs;
  8. end behavior; and
  9. vertical and horizontal asymptotes.

AFDA.2

The student will use knowledge of transformations to write an equation, given the graph of a linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic function .

AII.5

The student will investigate and apply the properties of arithmetic and geometric sequences and series to solve practical problems, including writing the first n terms, determining the nth term, and evaluating summation formulas. Notation will include Ʃ and an.

AII.6

For absolute value, square root, cube root, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions, the student will
  1. recognize the general shape of function families; and
  2. use knowledge of transformations to convert between equations and the corresponding graph of functions.

AII.7

The student will investigate and analyze linear, quadratic, absolute value, square root, cube root, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic function families algebraically and graphically. Key concepts include< /br>
  1. domain, range, and continuity;
  2. intervals in which a function is increasing or decreasing;
  3. extrema;
  4. zeros;
  5. intercepts;
  6. values of a function for elements in its domain;
  7. connections between and among multiple representations of functions using verbal descriptions, tables, equations, and graphs;
  8. end behavior;
  9. vertical and horizontal asymptotes;
  10. inverse of a function; and
  11. composition of functions algebraically and graphically.

MA.2

The student will investigate and identify the characteristics of exponential and logarithmic functions to graph the function, solve equations, and solve practical problems.

Science

BIO.8

The student will investigate and understand dynamic equilibria within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Key concepts include
  1. interactions within and among populations, including carrying capacities, limiting factors, and growth curves;
  2. nutrient cycling with energy flow through ecosystems;
  3. succession patterns in ecosystems;
  4. the effects of natural events and human activities on ecosystems; and
  5. analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems.