# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Agricultural Production Technology Task 75051198

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe best management practices for the forest.

Definition

Description should include
  • defining nonpoint source pollution and point source pollution
  • planning for forestry operations
    • communication of expectations
    • harvest – maximum return
    • site productivity
    • minimal environmental impact
    • compliance with federal, state, and local laws
    • enhancement of habitat for wildlife diversity
  • identifying endangered species
    • Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries
    • Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), Division of Natural Heritage
    • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • identifying Streamside Management Zones (SMZs)
  • explaining timber harvesting (e.g., logging system selection and application, forest roads, skid trails, stream crossings, log landings)
  • identifying erosion control measures
  • defining reforestation and revegetation
  • exploring current regulations
    • Federal Clean Water Act—Mandated Road Best Management Practices for Wetlands
    • Silvicultural Operations in Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas
    • Silviculture Water Quality Law (Virginia)
    • Debris in Streams Law
  • identifying relevant agencies
    • Virginia Department of Forestry
    • Virginia Marine Resources Commission
    • Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries
    • Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation – Division of Natural Heritage
    • Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
    • Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy
    • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
    • DCR Division of Chesapeake Bay Local Assistance
  • explaining silvicultural chemical treatments
  • identifying methods for fire management
  • discussing wetlands and watersheds
  • discussing methods for planting and harvesting trees in a sustainable manner
  • explaining pest-management techniques and the treatment of common diseases.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What are common forest products, and for what are they used?
  • What is timber stand improvement (TSI)?
  • How is the volume of standing timber on a given tract estimated?
  • What are some common tree disorders and their causes?
  • Why is it important to be able to use a compass when managing a tract of timber?

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.1

The student will make planned multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Make strategic use of multimodal tools.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively with diverse teams including setting rules and goals for group work such as coming to informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, and presenting alternate views.
  4. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks.
  5. Include all group members and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  8. Choose vocabulary, language, and tone appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Access, critically evaluate, and use information accurately to solve problems.
  10. Use reflection to evaluate one’s own role and the group process in small-group activities.
  11. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, use of evidence, rhetoric, and identify any faulty reasoning.

10.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms, to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.1

The student will make planned informative and persuasive multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Select and effectively use multimodal tools to design and develop presentation content.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with diverse teams.
  4. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  5. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  6. Anticipate and address alternative or opposing perspectives and counterclaims.
  7. Evaluate the various techniques used to construct arguments in multimodal presentations.
  8. Use vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Evaluate effectiveness of multimodal presentations.

11.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

Science

BIO.8

The student will investigate and understand dynamic equilibria within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Key concepts include
  1. interactions within and among populations, including carrying capacities, limiting factors, and growth curves;
  2. nutrient cycling with energy flow through ecosystems;
  3. succession patterns in ecosystems;
  4. the effects of natural events and human activities on ecosystems; and
  5. analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems.

ES.8

The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include
  1. processes of soil development;
  2. development of karst topography;
  3. relationships between groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones, and the water table;
  4. identification of sources of fresh water, including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle;
  5. dependence on freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water quality; and
  6. identification of the major watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.