# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Business Individualized Program (Development) Task 1614042470

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Demonstrate reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making skills.

Definition

Demonstration of reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making skills includes

  • differentiating among types of problems (e.g., technical, human relations, ethical)
  • using established methods of problem solving and decision making in both individual and group settings
  • applying previous learning to situations where problems must be solved or decisions made quickly
  • predicting short- and long-term effects of proposed solutions or decisions
  • testing solutions or decisions to determine effects or to identify related problems.

Related Standards of Learning

English

7.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features including type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  3. Make inferences and draw logical conclusions using explicit and implied textual evidence.
  4. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  5. Identify the source, viewpoint, and purpose of texts.
  6. Describe how word choice and language structure convey an author’s viewpoint.
  7. Identify the main idea.
  8. Summarize text identifying supporting details.
  9. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Organize and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

8.6

The student will read, comprehend, and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  2. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to analyze selections.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview or locate information.
  4. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  5. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, word choice, and impact.
  6. Analyze details for relevance and accuracy.
  7. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  8. Identify the main idea.
  9. Summarize the text identifying supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Evaluate, organize, and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

CE.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting evidence from primary and secondary sources, including charts, graphs, and political cartoons;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. analyzing information to create diagrams, tables, charts, graphs, and spreadsheets;
  4. determining the accuracy and validity of information by separating fact and opinion and recognizing bias;
  5. constructing informed, evidence-based arguments from multiple sources;
  6. determining multiple cause-and-effect relationships that impact political and economic events;
  7. taking informed action to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the costs and benefits of a specific choice;
  9. applying civic virtue and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. defending conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from sources.

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

Science

BIO.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. observations of living organisms are recorded in the lab and in the field;
  2. hypotheses are formulated based on direct observations and information from scientific literature;
  3. variables are defined and investigations are designed to test hypotheses;
  4. graphing and arithmetic calculations are used as tools in data analysis;
  5. conclusions are formed based on recorded quantitative and qualitative data;
  6. sources of error inherent in experimental design are identified and discussed;
  7. validity of data is determined;
  8. chemicals and equipment are used in a safe manner;
  9. appropriate technology including computers, graphing calculators, and probeware is used for gathering and analyzing data, communicating results, modeling concepts, and simulating experimental conditions;
  10. research utilizes scientific literature;
  11. differentiation is made among a scientific hypothesis, theory, and law;
  12. alternative scientific explanations and models are recognized and analyzed; and
  13. current applications of biological concepts are used.

PH.3

The student will investigate and demonstrate an understanding of the nature of science, scientific reasoning, and logic. Key concepts include
  1. analysis of scientific sources to develop and refine research hypotheses;
  2. analysis of how science explains and predicts relationships;
  3. evaluation of evidence for scientific theories;
  4. examination of how new discoveries result in modification of existing theories or establishment of new paradigms; and
  5. construction and defense of a scientific viewpoint.

Other Related Standards

FBLA Competitive Events and Activities Areas

3D Animation

 

Accounting I

 

Accounting II

 

Advertising

 

American Enterprise Project

 

Banking and Financial Systems

 

Business Calculations

 

Business Communication

 

Business Ethics

 

Business Financial Plan

 

Business Law

 

Business Plan

 

Business Skills and Knowledge

 

Client Service

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Coding and Programming

 

Community Service Project

 

Computer Applications

 

Computer Game & Simulation Programming

 

Computer Problem Solving

 

Cyber Security

 

D. J. Howard/Walker/Shell/Campbell/VBEA Scholarship/S.L.T. Award of Excellence

 

Database Design & Applications

 

Desktop Application Programming

 

Digital Video Production

 

E-Business

 

Economics

 

Electronic Career Portfolio

 

Emerging Business Issues

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Entrepreneurship

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

FBLA Principles and Procedures

 

Future Business Leader

 

Global Business

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Gold Seal Chapter Award of Merit (Hollis and Kitty Guy Award)

 

Graphic Design

 

Health Care Administration

 

Help Desk

 

Honor Chapter Award

 

Impromptu Speaking

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Insurance and Risk Management

 

Introduction to Business

 

Introduction to Business Communication

 

Introduction to Business Presentation

 

Introduction to Business Procedures

 

Introduction to Financial Math

 

Introduction to Information Technology

 

Introduction to Parliamentary Procedure

 

Job Interview

 

Journalism

 

L. Marguerite Crumley, Frank Manning Peele, Foundation's Sarah Lowe Thompson Scholarships

 

Largest Local Chapter Membership

 

LifeSmarts

 

Local Chapter Annual Business Report (Hamden L. Forkner Award)

 

Management Decision Making

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Management Information Systems

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Marketing

 The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Microsoft Office Specialist Excel and Word

 

Mobile Application Development

 

Network Design

 

Networking Concepts

 

Organizational Leadership

 

Parliamentary Procedure (Dorothy L. Travis Award)

 

Partnership with Business Project

 

Personal Finance

 

Public Service Announcement

 

Public Speaking I

 

Public Speaking II

 

Publication Design

 

Sales Presentation

 

Securities and Investments

 

Social Media Campaign

 

Spreadsheet Applications

 

State Service Project

  

Virtual Business Management Challenge

 

Website Design

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Who's Who in FBLA

 

Word Processing