# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Programming Task 1407857

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe ways that computer programs can be used in business and industry.

Definition

Description should be based on real-world examples gathered from various sources (e.g., online research, guest speakers, field trips to business and industry).

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

Other Related Standards

FBLA Competitive Events and Activities Areas

Business Procedures

 

E-Business

 

Electronic Career Portfolio

 

Emerging Business Issues

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Job Interview

 

Management Information Systems

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Web Site Design

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

NBEA Achievement Standards for Career Development

Explain how the needs and functions of society influence the nature and structure of work.

  

Explain the concept of transferable skills within and between career clusters.

   
 

Identify community businesspeople and describe career opportunities in their professional fields.

   
 

List and describe the contributions of various types of occupations in the community (e.g., banker, realtor, police officer, teacher, and firefighter).

   
 

Use a variety of research tools (e.g., computer-assisted programs, newspapers, books, professional and trade associations, informational interviews, job shadowing, career fairs, and the Internet) in the career exploration process.